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postgraduate thesis: A qualitative study of Chinese male sexual minority students navigating heterosexism in Hong Kong secondary schools

TitleA qualitative study of Chinese male sexual minority students navigating heterosexism in Hong Kong secondary schools
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Kwok, K. D. [郭勤]. (2011). A qualitative study of Chinese male sexual minority students navigating heterosexism in Hong Kong secondary schools. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4804339
AbstractThis phenomenological qualitative study is informed by integrated theories including a social constructionist perspective on human sexuality, sexual identity development models, heterosexism with theoretical support of minority stress model and feminist theory. The aim was to uncover the lived experiences of 20 male sexual minority students navigating heterosexism in secondary schools, within the socio-cultural context of Hong Kong Chinese society. Due to the invisibility of sexual minority adolescents in Hong Kong, purposeful sampling was used to recruit informants who were having same-sex sexual attractions and/or sexual behaviors/sexual identity. Over the period 2008-2011, twenty male informants, aged 14 to 19 and currently enrolled in secondary schools, were recruited for in-depth interviews. In terms of community labels, these informants might be known as gay, bisexual, memBa, tongzhi, tongxinglian, and those who are still questioning their sexual identity. Parental consents were waived for informants under eighteen years old and alternative measures were carried out to safeguard confidentiality and their best interests. Qualitative data analyses via a software package NVivo yielded several overarching themes: 1) “exploring my sexuality in school”; 2) “feeling powerless over overt homophobia”; 3) “feeling alienated over heteronormative assumptions”; 4) “feeling oppressed over silencing”; 5) “angry over curriculum omission”; 6) “distressed with risk stories”; and 7) “empowered with stories of resilience”. The results suggest that with variations in their sexual identity developmental process, they defined and interpreted their sexualities with reference to the specific social cultural context of Hong Kong, especially linked to the Christian value, Chinese Confucianism and Western human rights concepts. In the process of exploring a stigmatized sexual identity within schools, the informants generally felt powerless, alienated, and oppressed when encountering psychological and cultural heterosexism, manifested through overt and subtle forms by individuals and the systems within the school context. In the process of navigating homophobia and heterosexism, informants shared both risk and resilience stories. The current findings will be helpful for those in the teaching and counseling professions. These professionals can also help raise public awareness of this group of students in order to eliminate the social stigma, prejudice, and discrimination that still plague sexual minorities. Recommendations are made for further research, education policy, professional training for teachers and counselors, and support services for sexual minority students.
DegreeDoctor of Education
SubjectGender identity in education - China - Hong Kong
Heterosexism in high schools - China - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramEducation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212639

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Kan, Diana-
dc.contributor.author郭勤-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-24T23:11:19Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-24T23:11:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationKwok, K. D. [郭勤]. (2011). A qualitative study of Chinese male sexual minority students navigating heterosexism in Hong Kong secondary schools. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4804339-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212639-
dc.description.abstractThis phenomenological qualitative study is informed by integrated theories including a social constructionist perspective on human sexuality, sexual identity development models, heterosexism with theoretical support of minority stress model and feminist theory. The aim was to uncover the lived experiences of 20 male sexual minority students navigating heterosexism in secondary schools, within the socio-cultural context of Hong Kong Chinese society. Due to the invisibility of sexual minority adolescents in Hong Kong, purposeful sampling was used to recruit informants who were having same-sex sexual attractions and/or sexual behaviors/sexual identity. Over the period 2008-2011, twenty male informants, aged 14 to 19 and currently enrolled in secondary schools, were recruited for in-depth interviews. In terms of community labels, these informants might be known as gay, bisexual, memBa, tongzhi, tongxinglian, and those who are still questioning their sexual identity. Parental consents were waived for informants under eighteen years old and alternative measures were carried out to safeguard confidentiality and their best interests. Qualitative data analyses via a software package NVivo yielded several overarching themes: 1) “exploring my sexuality in school”; 2) “feeling powerless over overt homophobia”; 3) “feeling alienated over heteronormative assumptions”; 4) “feeling oppressed over silencing”; 5) “angry over curriculum omission”; 6) “distressed with risk stories”; and 7) “empowered with stories of resilience”. The results suggest that with variations in their sexual identity developmental process, they defined and interpreted their sexualities with reference to the specific social cultural context of Hong Kong, especially linked to the Christian value, Chinese Confucianism and Western human rights concepts. In the process of exploring a stigmatized sexual identity within schools, the informants generally felt powerless, alienated, and oppressed when encountering psychological and cultural heterosexism, manifested through overt and subtle forms by individuals and the systems within the school context. In the process of navigating homophobia and heterosexism, informants shared both risk and resilience stories. The current findings will be helpful for those in the teaching and counseling professions. These professionals can also help raise public awareness of this group of students in order to eliminate the social stigma, prejudice, and discrimination that still plague sexual minorities. Recommendations are made for further research, education policy, professional training for teachers and counselors, and support services for sexual minority students.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshGender identity in education - China - Hong Kong-
dc.subject.lcshHeterosexism in high schools - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleA qualitative study of Chinese male sexual minority students navigating heterosexism in Hong Kong secondary schools-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4804339-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Education-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4804339-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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