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Article: Chinese Social Media Reaction to Information about 42 Notifiable Infectious Diseases

TitleChinese Social Media Reaction to Information about 42 Notifiable Infectious Diseases
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action
Citation
PLOS ONE, 2015, v. 10 n. 5, article no. e0126092 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study aimed to identify what information triggered social media users' responses regarding infectious diseases. Chinese microblogs in 2012 regarding 42 infectious diseases were obtained through a keyword search in the Weiboscope database. Qualitative content analysis was performed for the posts pertinent to each keyword of the day of the year with the highest daily count. Similar posts were grouped and coded. We identified five categories of information that increased microblog traffic pertaining to infectious diseases: news of an outbreak or a case; health education / information; alternative health information / Traditional Chinese Medicine; commercial advertisement / entertainment; and social issues. News unrelated to the specified infectious diseases also led to elevated microblog traffic. Our study showcases the diverse contexts from which increased social media traffic occur. Our results will facilitate better health communication as causes underlying increased social media traffic are revealed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212340
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.057
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.395
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
Errata

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFung, ICH-
dc.contributor.authorHao, Y-
dc.contributor.authorCai, J-
dc.contributor.authorYing, Y-
dc.contributor.authorSchaible, BJ-
dc.contributor.authorYu, CM-
dc.contributor.authorTse, ZTH-
dc.contributor.authorFu, KW-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:32:50Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:32:50Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationPLOS ONE, 2015, v. 10 n. 5, article no. e0126092-
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212340-
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to identify what information triggered social media users' responses regarding infectious diseases. Chinese microblogs in 2012 regarding 42 infectious diseases were obtained through a keyword search in the Weiboscope database. Qualitative content analysis was performed for the posts pertinent to each keyword of the day of the year with the highest daily count. Similar posts were grouped and coded. We identified five categories of information that increased microblog traffic pertaining to infectious diseases: news of an outbreak or a case; health education / information; alternative health information / Traditional Chinese Medicine; commercial advertisement / entertainment; and social issues. News unrelated to the specified infectious diseases also led to elevated microblog traffic. Our study showcases the diverse contexts from which increased social media traffic occur. Our results will facilitate better health communication as causes underlying increased social media traffic are revealed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.plosone.org/home.action-
dc.relation.ispartofPLOS ONE-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleChinese Social Media Reaction to Information about 42 Notifiable Infectious Diseases-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailFu, KW: kwfu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityFu, KW=rp00552-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0126092-
dc.identifier.pmid25946020-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4422708-
dc.identifier.hkuros244293-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e0126092-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e0126092-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000354049700111-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.relation.erratumdoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0129525-

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