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Article: Perceptual biases and cue weighting in perception of 3D slant from texture and stereo information

TitlePerceptual biases and cue weighting in perception of 3D slant from texture and stereo information
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherARVO. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
Journal of Vision, 2015, v. 15 n. 2, p. 14 How to Cite?
AbstractMultiple cues are typically available for perceiving the 3D slant of surfaces, and slant perception has been used as a test case for investigating cue integration. Previous evidence suggests that texture and stereo slant cues contribute in an optimal Bayesian manner. We tested whether a Bayesian model could also account for perceptual underestimation of slant from texture. One explanation proposed by Todd, Christensen, and Guckes (2010) is that slant from texture is based on an inaccurate optical variable. An alternative Bayesian explanation is that perceptual underestimation is due to the influence of frontal cues and/or a frontal prior, which is weighted according to the reliability of slant cues. We measured slant perception using a hand-alignment task for conditions that provided only texture, only stereo, or combined texture and stereo cues. Slant estimates from monocular texture showed large biases toward frontal, with proportionally more underestimation at low slants than high slants. Slant estimates from stereo alone were more accurate, and adding texture information did not reduce accuracy. These results are consistent with a frontal influence that is decreasingly weighted as slant information becomes more reliable. We also included conditions with small cue conflicts to measure the relative weighting of texture and stereo cues. Consistent with previous studies, texture had a significant effect on slant estimates in binocular conditions, and the relative weighting of texture increased with slant. In some cases, perceived slant from combined stereo and texture cues was higher than from either cue in isolation. Both the perceptual biases and the cue weights were generally consistent with a Bayesian model that optimally integrates texture and stereo slant cues with frontal cues and/or a frontal prior.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212305

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, JA-
dc.contributor.authorCHEN, Z-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:31:21Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:31:21Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Vision, 2015, v. 15 n. 2, p. 14-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212305-
dc.description.abstractMultiple cues are typically available for perceiving the 3D slant of surfaces, and slant perception has been used as a test case for investigating cue integration. Previous evidence suggests that texture and stereo slant cues contribute in an optimal Bayesian manner. We tested whether a Bayesian model could also account for perceptual underestimation of slant from texture. One explanation proposed by Todd, Christensen, and Guckes (2010) is that slant from texture is based on an inaccurate optical variable. An alternative Bayesian explanation is that perceptual underestimation is due to the influence of frontal cues and/or a frontal prior, which is weighted according to the reliability of slant cues. We measured slant perception using a hand-alignment task for conditions that provided only texture, only stereo, or combined texture and stereo cues. Slant estimates from monocular texture showed large biases toward frontal, with proportionally more underestimation at low slants than high slants. Slant estimates from stereo alone were more accurate, and adding texture information did not reduce accuracy. These results are consistent with a frontal influence that is decreasingly weighted as slant information becomes more reliable. We also included conditions with small cue conflicts to measure the relative weighting of texture and stereo cues. Consistent with previous studies, texture had a significant effect on slant estimates in binocular conditions, and the relative weighting of texture increased with slant. In some cases, perceived slant from combined stereo and texture cues was higher than from either cue in isolation. Both the perceptual biases and the cue weights were generally consistent with a Bayesian model that optimally integrates texture and stereo slant cues with frontal cues and/or a frontal prior.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherARVO. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Vision-
dc.titlePerceptual biases and cue weighting in perception of 3D slant from texture and stereo information-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSaunders, JA: jsaun@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySaunders, JA=rp00638-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/15.2.14-
dc.identifier.hkuros245705-
dc.identifier.volume15-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage14-
dc.identifier.epage14-

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