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Conference Paper: Public perception of dental implants: a qualitative study

TitlePublic perception of dental implants: a qualitative study
Authors
KeywordsQualitative study
Dental implant
Focus Group
Public perception
Information acquisition
Issue Date2015
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.
Citation
The 2015 IADR/AADR/CADR General Session & Exhibition, Boston, MA., 11-14 March 2015. In Journal of Dental Research Meeting Abstracts, 2015, v. 94 Spec. Iss. A, abstract no. 4391 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: Dental implant has become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information about dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners of various levels and disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to understand public’s information acquisition about dental implant, their perceptions of dental implant and the impacts on their care seeking and decision making. METHODS: A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join 6 focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64-year-old, had never been engaged in dentally-related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered any dental consultation regarding implants. All focus groups were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Participants acquired information on dental implant through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected that dental implant restores patients’ appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implant as a panacea for all missing teeth cases and tended to overestimate its functions and longevity and underestimate the expertise needed for carrying out the clinical procedures. Their intention for seeking dental implant treatment was deterred by its high price, invasive procedures, risks and complications. CONCLUSIONS: Members of the public were exposed to information of varied quality and held some unrealistic expectations towards dental implants. Constructive patient-dentist communication may help build the trust and create positive clinical experience.
DescriptionePoster: abstract no. 4391
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212161
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, G-
dc.contributor.authorGao, X-
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:25:28Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:25:28Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2015 IADR/AADR/CADR General Session & Exhibition, Boston, MA., 11-14 March 2015. In Journal of Dental Research Meeting Abstracts, 2015, v. 94 Spec. Iss. A, abstract no. 4391-
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212161-
dc.descriptionePoster: abstract no. 4391-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: Dental implant has become a popular option for treating partially dentate or edentulous patients. Information about dental implants is widely available in the public domain and is disseminated through industries and dental practitioners of various levels and disciplines. This qualitative study aimed to understand public’s information acquisition about dental implant, their perceptions of dental implant and the impacts on their care seeking and decision making. METHODS: A purposive sample of 28 adults were recruited to join 6 focus groups. To be eligible, one must be 35-64-year-old, had never been engaged in dentally-related jobs, had at least one missing tooth, had heard about dental implant but never received dental implant or entered any dental consultation regarding implants. All focus groups were transcribed verbatim and subjected to thematic content analysis following grounded theory approach. RESULTS: Participants acquired information on dental implant through various means, such as patient information boards, printed advertisements, social media, and personal connections. They expected that dental implant restores patients’ appearance, functions, and quality of life to absolute normality. They regarded dental implant as a panacea for all missing teeth cases and tended to overestimate its functions and longevity and underestimate the expertise needed for carrying out the clinical procedures. Their intention for seeking dental implant treatment was deterred by its high price, invasive procedures, risks and complications. CONCLUSIONS: Members of the public were exposed to information of varied quality and held some unrealistic expectations towards dental implants. Constructive patient-dentist communication may help build the trust and create positive clinical experience.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Research Meeting Abstracts-
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research Meeting Abstracts. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectQualitative study-
dc.subjectDental implant-
dc.subjectFocus Group-
dc.subjectPublic perception-
dc.subjectInformation acquisition-
dc.titlePublic perception of dental implants: a qualitative study-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailGao, X: gaoxl@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: edward-lo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityGao, X=rp01509-
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015-
dc.identifier.hkuros245671-
dc.identifier.volume94-
dc.identifier.issueSpec. Iss. A-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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