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Article: Spatializing segregation measures: an approach to better depict social relationships

TitleSpatializing segregation measures: an approach to better depict social relationships
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherUS Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.huduser.org/periodicals/cityscape.html
Citation
Cityscape: a journal of policy development and research, 2015, v. 17 n. 1, p. 97-113 How to Cite?
AbstractSegregation involves more than one population group, and segregation measures quantify how different population groups are distributed across space. One of the key conceptual and methodological foundations of segregation studies is to account for the potential of spatial interaction among two or more population groups across areal units. This foundation implies the need for a spatial approach to portray the spatial (and thus social) interaction among neighbors. In general, simple percentages (for example, percent Black) are not a measure of segregation. Because local spatial segregation measures did not emerge until recently, the objectives of this article are threefold: (1) to explain a spatial approach for measuring the level of segregation at the neighborhood (or local) level, (2) to demonstrate the deficiencies of using a percentage of racial/ethnic group as a measure of segregation, and (3) to clarify the appropriateness of two commonly used indexes of dissimilarity and diversity. Data from St. Louis, Missouri, and Chicago, Illinois, are used to discuss these three points.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212065
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOka, M-
dc.contributor.authorWong, DWS-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:21:18Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:21:18Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationCityscape: a journal of policy development and research, 2015, v. 17 n. 1, p. 97-113-
dc.identifier.issn1936-007X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212065-
dc.description.abstractSegregation involves more than one population group, and segregation measures quantify how different population groups are distributed across space. One of the key conceptual and methodological foundations of segregation studies is to account for the potential of spatial interaction among two or more population groups across areal units. This foundation implies the need for a spatial approach to portray the spatial (and thus social) interaction among neighbors. In general, simple percentages (for example, percent Black) are not a measure of segregation. Because local spatial segregation measures did not emerge until recently, the objectives of this article are threefold: (1) to explain a spatial approach for measuring the level of segregation at the neighborhood (or local) level, (2) to demonstrate the deficiencies of using a percentage of racial/ethnic group as a measure of segregation, and (3) to clarify the appropriateness of two commonly used indexes of dissimilarity and diversity. Data from St. Louis, Missouri, and Chicago, Illinois, are used to discuss these three points.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherUS Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, Office of Policy Development and Research. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.huduser.org/periodicals/cityscape.html-
dc.relation.ispartofCityscape: a journal of policy development and research-
dc.titleSpatializing segregation measures: an approach to better depict social relationships-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, DWS: dwong2@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, DWS=rp01814-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros244432-
dc.identifier.volume17-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage97-
dc.identifier.epage113-
dc.publisher.placeWashington, DC, United States-

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