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Article: The contribution of cultural capital to students' mathematics achievement in medium and high socioeconomic gradient economies

TitleThe contribution of cultural capital to students' mathematics achievement in medium and high socioeconomic gradient economies
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1469-3518
Citation
British Educational Research Journal, 2015, v. 41 n. 6, p. 1050–1067 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present study addresses the issue of how different forms of cultural capital may influence children’s mathematics achievement in economies with different socioeconomic gradients. Data from 73,178 parent–child dyads from 10 economies with different socioeconomic gradients who participated in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 were analysed using hierarchical linear modelling. The cultural capital variables examined comprised the availability of home educational resources and parental educational expectations of their children. Results showed that after controlling for parent education, student gender and student history of repeating grades in the past, there were statistically significant main and interaction effects (home educational resources X parent education and parental educational expectations X parent education) of cultural capital on student achievement. Furthermore, these effects explained more student achievement variance in high than in medium socioeconomic gradient economies (7.45% vs 2.82% respectively). In particular, the main effects for parental educational expectations, and interaction effect between parental educational expectations and parent education were more pronounced in high as compared with medium socioeconomic gradient economies. Overall, the results underscore the challenges confronting low socioeconomic status (SES) parents who aspire social mobility for their children and the need for high SES parents to strategically ‘activate’ their cultural capital advantages to benefit their children’s achievement maximally.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212012
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.124
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.938

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, CY-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:19:16Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:19:16Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Educational Research Journal, 2015, v. 41 n. 6, p. 1050–1067-
dc.identifier.issn0141-1926-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/212012-
dc.description.abstractThe present study addresses the issue of how different forms of cultural capital may influence children’s mathematics achievement in economies with different socioeconomic gradients. Data from 73,178 parent–child dyads from 10 economies with different socioeconomic gradients who participated in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 were analysed using hierarchical linear modelling. The cultural capital variables examined comprised the availability of home educational resources and parental educational expectations of their children. Results showed that after controlling for parent education, student gender and student history of repeating grades in the past, there were statistically significant main and interaction effects (home educational resources X parent education and parental educational expectations X parent education) of cultural capital on student achievement. Furthermore, these effects explained more student achievement variance in high than in medium socioeconomic gradient economies (7.45% vs 2.82% respectively). In particular, the main effects for parental educational expectations, and interaction effect between parental educational expectations and parent education were more pronounced in high as compared with medium socioeconomic gradient economies. Overall, the results underscore the challenges confronting low socioeconomic status (SES) parents who aspire social mobility for their children and the need for high SES parents to strategically ‘activate’ their cultural capital advantages to benefit their children’s achievement maximally.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1469-3518-
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Educational Research Journal-
dc.rightsThis is the accepted version of the following article: British Educational Research Journal, 2015, v. 41 n. 6, p. 1050–1067, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/wol1/doi/10.1002/berj.3187/abstract-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleThe contribution of cultural capital to students' mathematics achievement in medium and high socioeconomic gradient economies-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTan, CY: tancy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTan, CY=rp01826-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/berj.3187-
dc.identifier.hkuros245566-
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1050-
dc.identifier.epage1067-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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