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Article: The Drama of International Relations: A South China Sea Simulation

TitleThe Drama of International Relations: A South China Sea Simulation
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1528-3577
Citation
International Studies Perspectives, 2014, v. 15 n. 4, p. 459-476 How to Cite?
AbstractA fundamental challenge in teaching international relations is the need to bridge the students’ learning gap between knowledge and practice, providing them with opportunities to reflect on what they have learned, and allowing them to develop a greater cognition of their own abilities in the area. The South China Sea is one of the most long-running and complex disputes in contemporary international affairs. It remains one of the few flashpoints around the globe that holds the potential to directly escalate into a great-power conflict. Understanding this issue is therefore an important task for students of IR and strategic studies, but the complexity of the dispute makes teaching it in a regular seminar/lecture format problematic. This article describes a simulation run in a masters-level class in the spring 2012 semester designed to address this pedagogical challenge. It started with a jeopardized security operation on a disputed oil platform in a real-world territory claimed by multiple states. This article explores the theoretical conception of the simulation, its structure and design, the post-simulation debriefing as well as considerations as to how the simulation might be modified to be more engaging to students and more relevant to intended learning outcomes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211971
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.914
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.998

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKempston, TJ-
dc.contributor.authorThomas, ND-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:18:30Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:18:30Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Studies Perspectives, 2014, v. 15 n. 4, p. 459-476-
dc.identifier.issn1528-3577-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211971-
dc.description.abstractA fundamental challenge in teaching international relations is the need to bridge the students’ learning gap between knowledge and practice, providing them with opportunities to reflect on what they have learned, and allowing them to develop a greater cognition of their own abilities in the area. The South China Sea is one of the most long-running and complex disputes in contemporary international affairs. It remains one of the few flashpoints around the globe that holds the potential to directly escalate into a great-power conflict. Understanding this issue is therefore an important task for students of IR and strategic studies, but the complexity of the dispute makes teaching it in a regular seminar/lecture format problematic. This article describes a simulation run in a masters-level class in the spring 2012 semester designed to address this pedagogical challenge. It started with a jeopardized security operation on a disputed oil platform in a real-world territory claimed by multiple states. This article explores the theoretical conception of the simulation, its structure and design, the post-simulation debriefing as well as considerations as to how the simulation might be modified to be more engaging to students and more relevant to intended learning outcomes.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1528-3577-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Studies Perspectives-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.titleThe Drama of International Relations: A South China Sea Simulation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKempston, TJ: kempston@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/insp.12045-
dc.identifier.hkuros244269-
dc.identifier.volume15-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage459-
dc.identifier.epage476-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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