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Article: The relationship between Internet addiction and depression among migrant children and left-behind children in China

TitleThe relationship between Internet addiction and depression among migrant children and left-behind children in China
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc. Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/overview/cyberpsychology-behavior-brand-social-networking/10/
Citation
CyberPsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 2012, v. 15 n. 11, p. 585-590 How to Cite?
AbstractWith greater Internet availability, the pathological use of the Internet has become an emerging mental health issue among adolescents in China. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between Internet addiction and depression in migrant children (MC) and left-behind children (LBC). The present study was conducted using a cross-sectional design with 3,254 participants (8-17-years old), which included 1143 LBC, 574 MC, and 1287 nonleft-behind rural children (RC) from 12 schools. Young's 8-item Internet Addiction Scale was used to assess Internet dependency. The Children's Depression Inventory-Short Form was used to measure child depression. The results showed that the prevalence of depression was 10.9 percent among RC, 19.7 percent among MC, and 14.3 percent among LBC. The prevalence of Internet addiction was 3.7 percent among RC, and was 6.4 percent among MC and 3.2 percent among LBC. Depression was effected by the interaction between types of children and Internet addiction. LBC with Internet addiction (odds ratio [OR], 2.780; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.237-6.248), MC with Internet addiction (OR, 2.922; 95 percent CI, 1.116-7.652), and MC with no Internet addiction (OR, 2.735; 95 percent CI, 1.974-3.789) had higher risks of depression than that for RC with no-Internet addiction. The results indicated that Internet addiction might be associated with an increased risk of depression in LBC, and migration was an important risk factor for child depression.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211931
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.188
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.408

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuo, J-
dc.contributor.authorChen, LP-
dc.contributor.authorWang, X-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChui, CH-
dc.contributor.authorHe, H-
dc.contributor.authorQu, Z-
dc.contributor.authorTian, D-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:16:32Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:16:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationCyberPsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 2012, v. 15 n. 11, p. 585-590-
dc.identifier.issn2152-2715-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211931-
dc.description.abstractWith greater Internet availability, the pathological use of the Internet has become an emerging mental health issue among adolescents in China. The objective of this study was to examine the associations between Internet addiction and depression in migrant children (MC) and left-behind children (LBC). The present study was conducted using a cross-sectional design with 3,254 participants (8-17-years old), which included 1143 LBC, 574 MC, and 1287 nonleft-behind rural children (RC) from 12 schools. Young's 8-item Internet Addiction Scale was used to assess Internet dependency. The Children's Depression Inventory-Short Form was used to measure child depression. The results showed that the prevalence of depression was 10.9 percent among RC, 19.7 percent among MC, and 14.3 percent among LBC. The prevalence of Internet addiction was 3.7 percent among RC, and was 6.4 percent among MC and 3.2 percent among LBC. Depression was effected by the interaction between types of children and Internet addiction. LBC with Internet addiction (odds ratio [OR], 2.780; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 1.237-6.248), MC with Internet addiction (OR, 2.922; 95 percent CI, 1.116-7.652), and MC with no Internet addiction (OR, 2.735; 95 percent CI, 1.974-3.789) had higher risks of depression than that for RC with no-Internet addiction. The results indicated that Internet addiction might be associated with an increased risk of depression in LBC, and migration was an important risk factor for child depression.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc. Publishers. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.liebertpub.com/overview/cyberpsychology-behavior-brand-social-networking/10/-
dc.relation.ispartofCyberPsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking-
dc.rightsFinal publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/cyber.2012.0261-
dc.titleThe relationship between Internet addiction and depression among migrant children and left-behind children in China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChui, CH: chkchui@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/cyber.2012.0261-
dc.identifier.pmid23002986-
dc.identifier.hkuros244589-
dc.identifier.volume15-
dc.identifier.issue11-
dc.identifier.spage585-
dc.identifier.epage590-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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