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Article: A systematic approach to novel virus discovery in emerging infectious disease outbreaks

TitleA systematic approach to novel virus discovery in emerging infectious disease outbreaks
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherAmerican Society for Investigative Pathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmd.amjpathol.org
Citation
The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, 2015, v. 17 n. 3, p. 230-241 How to Cite?
AbstractThe discovery of novel viruses is of great importance to human health - both in the setting of emerging infectious disease outbreaks and in disease syndromes of unknown etiology. Despite the recent proliferation of many efficient virus discovery methods, careful selection of a combination of methods is important to demonstrate a novel virus, its clinical associations, and its relevance in a timely manner. The identification of a patient or an outbreak with distinctive clinical features and negative routine microbiological workup is often the starting point for virus hunting. This review appraises the roles of culture, electron microscopy, and nucleic acid detection-based methods in optimizing virus discovery. Cell culture is generally slow but may yield viable virus. Although the choice of cell line often involves trial and error, it may be guided by the clinical syndrome. Electron microscopy is insensitive but fast, and may provide morphological clues to choice of cell line or consensus primers for nucleic acid detection. Consensus primer PCR can be used to detect viruses that are closely related to known virus families. Random primer amplification and high-throughput sequencing can catch any virus genome but cannot yield an infectious virion for testing Koch postulates. A systematic approach that incorporates carefully chosen combinations of virus detection techniques is required for successful virus discovery. © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211849
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.201
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.514
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSridhar, S-
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFW-
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:13:28Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:13:28Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, 2015, v. 17 n. 3, p. 230-241-
dc.identifier.issn1525-1578-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211849-
dc.description.abstractThe discovery of novel viruses is of great importance to human health - both in the setting of emerging infectious disease outbreaks and in disease syndromes of unknown etiology. Despite the recent proliferation of many efficient virus discovery methods, careful selection of a combination of methods is important to demonstrate a novel virus, its clinical associations, and its relevance in a timely manner. The identification of a patient or an outbreak with distinctive clinical features and negative routine microbiological workup is often the starting point for virus hunting. This review appraises the roles of culture, electron microscopy, and nucleic acid detection-based methods in optimizing virus discovery. Cell culture is generally slow but may yield viable virus. Although the choice of cell line often involves trial and error, it may be guided by the clinical syndrome. Electron microscopy is insensitive but fast, and may provide morphological clues to choice of cell line or consensus primers for nucleic acid detection. Consensus primer PCR can be used to detect viruses that are closely related to known virus families. Random primer amplification and high-throughput sequencing can catch any virus genome but cannot yield an infectious virion for testing Koch postulates. A systematic approach that incorporates carefully chosen combinations of virus detection techniques is required for successful virus discovery. © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Investigative Pathology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmd.amjpathol.org-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Journal of Molecular Diagnostics-
dc.titleA systematic approach to novel virus discovery in emerging infectious disease outbreaks-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSridhar, S: sid8998@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTo, KKW: kelvinto@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, JFW: jfwchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP: skplau@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTo, KKW=rp01384-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, JFW=rp01736-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486-
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jmoldx.2014.12.002-
dc.identifier.pmid25746799-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84928112811-
dc.identifier.hkuros245621-
dc.identifier.volume17-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage230-
dc.identifier.epage241-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000353843900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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