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Article: Dominant and novel clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants

TitleDominant and novel clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2015, v. 5 article no. 11857 How to Cite?
AbstractHere we employed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) and 16S rRNA genes to assess relative abundances of dominant clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (referred to Accumulibacter) in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from six countries. Accumulibacter were not only detected in the 6 WWTPs performing biological phosphorus removal, but also inhabited in the other 11 WWTPs employing conventional activated sludge (AS) with abundances ranging from 0.02% to 7.0%. Among the AS samples, clades IIC and IID were found to be dominant among the five Accumulibacter clades. The relative abundance of each clade in the Accumulibacter lineage significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with the influent total phosphorus and chemical oxygen demand instead of geographical factors (e.g. latitude), which showed that the local wastewater characteristics and WWTPs configurations could be more significant to determine the proliferation of Accumulibacter clades in full-scale WWTPs rather than the geographical location. Moreover, two novel Accumulibacter clades (IIH and II-I) which had not been previously detected were discovered in two EBPR WWTPs. The results deepened our understanding of the Accumulibacter diversity in environmental samples.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211734
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMao, Y-
dc.contributor.authorGraham, D W-
dc.contributor.authorTamaki, H-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, T-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-21T02:09:23Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-21T02:09:23Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2015, v. 5 article no. 11857-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211734-
dc.description.abstractHere we employed quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for polyphosphate kinase 1 (ppk1) and 16S rRNA genes to assess relative abundances of dominant clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (referred to Accumulibacter) in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from six countries. Accumulibacter were not only detected in the 6 WWTPs performing biological phosphorus removal, but also inhabited in the other 11 WWTPs employing conventional activated sludge (AS) with abundances ranging from 0.02% to 7.0%. Among the AS samples, clades IIC and IID were found to be dominant among the five Accumulibacter clades. The relative abundance of each clade in the Accumulibacter lineage significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with the influent total phosphorus and chemical oxygen demand instead of geographical factors (e.g. latitude), which showed that the local wastewater characteristics and WWTPs configurations could be more significant to determine the proliferation of Accumulibacter clades in full-scale WWTPs rather than the geographical location. Moreover, two novel Accumulibacter clades (IIH and II-I) which had not been previously detected were discovered in two EBPR WWTPs. The results deepened our understanding of the Accumulibacter diversity in environmental samples.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.titleDominant and novel clades of Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis in 18 globally distributed full-scale wastewater treatment plants-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMao, Y: maoyp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, T: zhangt@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, T=rp00211-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep11857-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4490554-
dc.identifier.hkuros245852-

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