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Conference Paper: Flipping the classroom and making it work

TitleFlipping the classroom and making it work
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
The 2014 Centre for English Studies (CAES) Seminar, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 8 October 2014. How to Cite?
AbstractThe flipped classroom in the business ED course is an attempt to design a course around the elements of learning-oriented assessment and academic literacies. Learningoriented assessment has been shown to result in better student performance through various strategies such as peer and self-assessment, feedback, shared success criteria and students taking ownership of their learning (E.g. Black & Wiliam, 1998; Carless, 2011). Academic literacies suggests that an explanation for student writing problems is the gaps between academic staff expectations and student interpretations of what is involved in academic writing (Lea & Street, 1998). This seminar addresses three challenges for teachers that result from the flipped classroom design and the theories that underpin it. These challenges are: the alignment of assessment to teaching and learning informed by an academic literacies approach; the role of the teacher in the class; and the physical space constraints to allow full participation by students.
DescriptionProfessional Development Seminar
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211486

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, PD-
dc.contributor.authorHazell, AAL-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-15T07:34:21Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-15T07:34:21Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 Centre for English Studies (CAES) Seminar, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 8 October 2014.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211486-
dc.descriptionProfessional Development Seminar-
dc.description.abstractThe flipped classroom in the business ED course is an attempt to design a course around the elements of learning-oriented assessment and academic literacies. Learningoriented assessment has been shown to result in better student performance through various strategies such as peer and self-assessment, feedback, shared success criteria and students taking ownership of their learning (E.g. Black & Wiliam, 1998; Carless, 2011). Academic literacies suggests that an explanation for student writing problems is the gaps between academic staff expectations and student interpretations of what is involved in academic writing (Lea & Street, 1998). This seminar addresses three challenges for teachers that result from the flipped classroom design and the theories that underpin it. These challenges are: the alignment of assessment to teaching and learning informed by an academic literacies approach; the role of the teacher in the class; and the physical space constraints to allow full participation by students.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU CAES Seminar-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleFlipping the classroom and making it work-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailSmyth, PD: psmyth@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHazell, AAL: ashleyhy@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros244862-

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