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Article: Activation of Th1 immunity is a common immune mechanism for the successful treatment of hepatitis B and C: revisited with tetramers assay and therapeutic implications

TitleActivation of Th1 immunity is a common immune mechanism for the successful treatment of hepatitis B and C: revisited with tetramers assay and therapeutic implications
Authors
KeywordsAntiviral Agents - pharmacology
Hepatitis B - drug therapy - immunology
Hepatitis C - drug therapy - immunology
Immunity, Cellular - drug effects
Th1 Cells - drug effects - immunology
Issue Date2003
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1021-7770
Citation
Journal of Biomedical Science, 2003, v. 10, p. 120-135 How to Cite?
AbstractBoth chronic hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections respond ineffectively to current antiviral therapies. Recent studies have suggested that treatment outcomes may depend on the development of type 1 T helper (Th1) and Th2 cell responses. Specifically, activation of Th1 immunity may play a major role in successfully treating hepatitis B and C. This model was revisited herein by evaluating immune responses in 36 HBV and 40 HCV patients with or without treatment, in an attempt to find a common immune mechanism for successful treatment. The immune responses in all examined cases were studied by peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation and cytokine responses to viral antigens, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, and tetramer staining of virus-specific CD8+ T cells. The overall results revealed that all responders among both HBV- and HCV-infected cases displayed significantly higher PBMC proliferation to viral antigens with a predominant Th1 cytokine profile. Furthermore, the Th1-dominant responses were associated with significant enhancement of CTL activities and were correlated with ELISPOT data, while non-responders responded more weakly. During therapy, the numbers of tetramer-staining, virus-specific CD8+ T cells showed greater increases in responders than in non-responders (p = 0.001). The frequencies determined by the tetramer assay were approximately 200-fold higher than data estimated by limiting-dilution analysis. In conclusion, activation of Th1 immunity accompanied by enhancement of CTL activity during therapy is a common immune mechanism for successfully treating hepatitis B and C, and therefore may have important therapeutic implications.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211388
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.935
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.280

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsai, SL-
dc.contributor.authorSheen, IS-
dc.contributor.authorChien, RN-
dc.contributor.authorChu, CM-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, HC-
dc.contributor.authorChuang, YL-
dc.contributor.authorLee, TH-
dc.contributor.authorLiao, SK-
dc.contributor.authorLin, CL-
dc.contributor.authorKuo, GC-
dc.contributor.authorLiaw, YF-
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-10T01:41:19Z-
dc.date.available2015-07-10T01:41:19Z-
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Biomedical Science, 2003, v. 10, p. 120-135-
dc.identifier.issn1021-7770-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/211388-
dc.description.abstractBoth chronic hepatitis B and C virus (HBV and HCV) infections respond ineffectively to current antiviral therapies. Recent studies have suggested that treatment outcomes may depend on the development of type 1 T helper (Th1) and Th2 cell responses. Specifically, activation of Th1 immunity may play a major role in successfully treating hepatitis B and C. This model was revisited herein by evaluating immune responses in 36 HBV and 40 HCV patients with or without treatment, in an attempt to find a common immune mechanism for successful treatment. The immune responses in all examined cases were studied by peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation and cytokine responses to viral antigens, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, and tetramer staining of virus-specific CD8+ T cells. The overall results revealed that all responders among both HBV- and HCV-infected cases displayed significantly higher PBMC proliferation to viral antigens with a predominant Th1 cytokine profile. Furthermore, the Th1-dominant responses were associated with significant enhancement of CTL activities and were correlated with ELISPOT data, while non-responders responded more weakly. During therapy, the numbers of tetramer-staining, virus-specific CD8+ T cells showed greater increases in responders than in non-responders (p = 0.001). The frequencies determined by the tetramer assay were approximately 200-fold higher than data estimated by limiting-dilution analysis. In conclusion, activation of Th1 immunity accompanied by enhancement of CTL activity during therapy is a common immune mechanism for successfully treating hepatitis B and C, and therefore may have important therapeutic implications.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=1021-7770-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biomedical Science-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectAntiviral Agents - pharmacology-
dc.subjectHepatitis B - drug therapy - immunology-
dc.subjectHepatitis C - drug therapy - immunology-
dc.subjectImmunity, Cellular - drug effects-
dc.subjectTh1 Cells - drug effects - immunology-
dc.titleActivation of Th1 immunity is a common immune mechanism for the successful treatment of hepatitis B and C: revisited with tetramers assay and therapeutic implications-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLin, CL: clin@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000068091-
dc.identifier.pmid12566993-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037261447-
dc.identifier.hkuros78923-
dc.identifier.hkuros80952-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.spage120-
dc.identifier.epage135-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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