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Article: Effect of a hospital policy of not accepting free infant formula on in-hospital formula supplementation rates and breast-feeding duration

TitleEffect of a hospital policy of not accepting free infant formula on in-hospital formula supplementation rates and breast-feeding duration
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PHN
Citation
Public Health Nutrition, 2015, v. 18 n. 14, p. 2689-2699 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of public hospitals in Hong Kong not accepting free infant formula from manufacturers on in-hospital formula supplementation rates and breast-feeding duration. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: In-patient postnatal units of four public hospitals in Hong Kong. SUBJECTS: Two cohorts of breast-feeding mother-infant pairs (n 2560). Cohort 1 (n 1320) was recruited before implementation of the policy to stop accepting free infant formula and cohort 2 (n 1240) was recruited after policy implementation. Participants were followed prospectively for 12 months or until they stopped breast-feeding. RESULTS: The mean number of formula supplements given to infants in the first 24 h was 2·70 (sd 3·11) in cohort 1 and 1·17 (sd 1·94) in cohort 2 (P<0·001). The proportion of infants who were exclusively breast-fed during the hospital stay increased from 17·7 % in cohort 1 to 41·3 % in cohort 2 (P<0·001) and the risk of breast-feeding cessation was significantly lower in cohort 2 (hazard ratio=0·81; 95 % CI 0·73, 0·90). Participants who non-exclusively breast-fed during the hospital stay had a significantly higher risk of stopping any or exclusive breast-feeding. Higher levels of formula supplementation also increased the risk of breast-feeding cessation in a dose-response pattern. CONCLUSIONS: After implementation of a hospital policy to pay market price for infant formula, rates of in-hospital formula supplementation were reduced and the rates of in-hospital exclusive breast-feeding and breast-feeding duration increased.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210980
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.433
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.995

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, AM-
dc.contributor.authorLok, YWK-
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT-
dc.contributor.authorLee, ILY-
dc.contributor.authorSham, A-
dc.contributor.authorLam, C-
dc.contributor.authorWu, KM-
dc.contributor.authorBai, DL-
dc.contributor.authorWong Cheung, KL-
dc.contributor.authorWong, EMY-
dc.contributor.authorChan, NPT-
dc.contributor.authorDodgson, JE-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-23T06:02:07Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-23T06:02:07Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationPublic Health Nutrition, 2015, v. 18 n. 14, p. 2689-2699-
dc.identifier.issn1368-9800-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210980-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of public hospitals in Hong Kong not accepting free infant formula from manufacturers on in-hospital formula supplementation rates and breast-feeding duration. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: In-patient postnatal units of four public hospitals in Hong Kong. SUBJECTS: Two cohorts of breast-feeding mother-infant pairs (n 2560). Cohort 1 (n 1320) was recruited before implementation of the policy to stop accepting free infant formula and cohort 2 (n 1240) was recruited after policy implementation. Participants were followed prospectively for 12 months or until they stopped breast-feeding. RESULTS: The mean number of formula supplements given to infants in the first 24 h was 2·70 (sd 3·11) in cohort 1 and 1·17 (sd 1·94) in cohort 2 (P<0·001). The proportion of infants who were exclusively breast-fed during the hospital stay increased from 17·7 % in cohort 1 to 41·3 % in cohort 2 (P<0·001) and the risk of breast-feeding cessation was significantly lower in cohort 2 (hazard ratio=0·81; 95 % CI 0·73, 0·90). Participants who non-exclusively breast-fed during the hospital stay had a significantly higher risk of stopping any or exclusive breast-feeding. Higher levels of formula supplementation also increased the risk of breast-feeding cessation in a dose-response pattern. CONCLUSIONS: After implementation of a hospital policy to pay market price for infant formula, rates of in-hospital formula supplementation were reduced and the rates of in-hospital exclusive breast-feeding and breast-feeding duration increased.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PHN-
dc.relation.ispartofPublic Health Nutrition-
dc.rightsPublic Health Nutrition. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleEffect of a hospital policy of not accepting free infant formula on in-hospital formula supplementation rates and breast-feeding duration-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTarrant, AM: tarrantm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLok, YWK: krislok@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWu, KM: wukendra@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, NPT: nptchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTarrant, AM=rp00461-
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, NPT=rp01680-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1368980015000117-
dc.identifier.pmid25721766-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84941932490-
dc.identifier.hkuros243407-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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