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Article: Changing forms and sudden smooth transitions of tsunami waves

TitleChanging forms and sudden smooth transitions of tsunami waves
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.com/journal/40722
Citation
Journal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy, 2015, v. 1 n. 2, p. 145-156 How to Cite?
AbstractIn some tsunami waves travelling over the ocean, such as the one approaching the eastern coast of Japan in 2011, the sea surface of the ocean is depressed by a small metre-scale displacement over a multi-kilometre horizontal length scale, lying in front of a positive elevation of comparable magnitude and length, which together constitute a down-up wave. Shallow water theory shows that the latter travels faster than the former, leading to an interaction, whose description is the issue addressed in this paper, using model equations of the Korteweg–de Vries type. First, we re-examine the undular bore solutions of the Korteweg–de Vries equation which describe how an initial depression wave deforms into a depression rarefaction wave followed by an undular bore of large elevation waves riding on this depression. Then we develop a new extended Korteweg–de Vries equation some of whose solutions can be used to describe the interaction of an elevation wave chasing a depression wave. These show that the two waves coincide at a given position and time producing a maximum elevation. Typically this amplitude is larger than the initial displacement magnitude by a factor which can be as large as two, which may explain anomalous elevations of tsunamis at particular positions along their trajectories. It is physically significant that for these small amplitude waves, no wave breaking occurs and there is no excess dissipation. Then, following the transition, the elevation wave moves ahead of the depression wave and the distance between them increases either linearly or logarithmically with time. The implications for how these down-up tsunami waves reach the shoreline are considered.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210744
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGrimshaw, RHJ-
dc.contributor.authorHunt, JCR-
dc.contributor.authorChow, KW-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-23T05:49:06Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-23T05:49:06Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy, 2015, v. 1 n. 2, p. 145-156-
dc.identifier.issn2198-6444-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210744-
dc.description.abstractIn some tsunami waves travelling over the ocean, such as the one approaching the eastern coast of Japan in 2011, the sea surface of the ocean is depressed by a small metre-scale displacement over a multi-kilometre horizontal length scale, lying in front of a positive elevation of comparable magnitude and length, which together constitute a down-up wave. Shallow water theory shows that the latter travels faster than the former, leading to an interaction, whose description is the issue addressed in this paper, using model equations of the Korteweg–de Vries type. First, we re-examine the undular bore solutions of the Korteweg–de Vries equation which describe how an initial depression wave deforms into a depression rarefaction wave followed by an undular bore of large elevation waves riding on this depression. Then we develop a new extended Korteweg–de Vries equation some of whose solutions can be used to describe the interaction of an elevation wave chasing a depression wave. These show that the two waves coincide at a given position and time producing a maximum elevation. Typically this amplitude is larger than the initial displacement magnitude by a factor which can be as large as two, which may explain anomalous elevations of tsunamis at particular positions along their trajectories. It is physically significant that for these small amplitude waves, no wave breaking occurs and there is no excess dissipation. Then, following the transition, the elevation wave moves ahead of the depression wave and the distance between them increases either linearly or logarithmically with time. The implications for how these down-up tsunami waves reach the shoreline are considered.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.com/journal/40722-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Ocean Engineering and Marine Energy-
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40722-014-0011-1-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleChanging forms and sudden smooth transitions of tsunami waves-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChow, KW: kwchow@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChow, KW=rp00112-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40722-014-0011-1-
dc.identifier.hkuros243787-
dc.identifier.volume1-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage145-
dc.identifier.epage156-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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