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Article: Young driver distraction by text messaging: A comparison of the effects of reading and typing text messages in Chinese versus English

TitleYoung driver distraction by text messaging: A comparison of the effects of reading and typing text messages in Chinese versus English
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/trf
Citation
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 2015, v. 31, p. 87-98 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Reading and typing text messages while driving seriously impairs driving performance and are prohibited activities in many jurisdictions. Hong Kong is a bilingual society and many people write in both Chinese and English. As the input methods for text messaging in Chinese and English are considerably different, this study used a driving simulator approach to compare the effects of reading and typing Chinese and English text messages on driving performance. Method: The driving performances of 26 participants were monitored under the following conditions: (1) no distraction, (2) reading and typing Chinese text messages, and (3) reading and typing English text messages. The following measures of driving performance were collected under all of the conditions: reaction time (RT), driving lane undulation (DLU), driving speed fluctuation (DSF), and car-following distance (CFD) between test and leading cars. Results: RT, DLU, and DSF were significantly impaired by reading and typing both Chinese and English text messages. Moreover, typing text messages distracted drivers more than reading them. Although the Chinese text messaging input system is more complicated than the English system, the use of Chinese did not cause a significantly different degree of distraction. Conclusion: Both reading and typing text messages while driving should be prohibited regardless of whether Chinese or English is used.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210699
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.444
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.929

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYan, W-
dc.contributor.authorWong, SC-
dc.contributor.authorLi, YC-
dc.contributor.authorSze, NN-
dc.contributor.authorYan, X-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-23T05:47:43Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-23T05:47:43Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationTransportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 2015, v. 31, p. 87-98-
dc.identifier.issn1369-8478-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210699-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Reading and typing text messages while driving seriously impairs driving performance and are prohibited activities in many jurisdictions. Hong Kong is a bilingual society and many people write in both Chinese and English. As the input methods for text messaging in Chinese and English are considerably different, this study used a driving simulator approach to compare the effects of reading and typing Chinese and English text messages on driving performance. Method: The driving performances of 26 participants were monitored under the following conditions: (1) no distraction, (2) reading and typing Chinese text messages, and (3) reading and typing English text messages. The following measures of driving performance were collected under all of the conditions: reaction time (RT), driving lane undulation (DLU), driving speed fluctuation (DSF), and car-following distance (CFD) between test and leading cars. Results: RT, DLU, and DSF were significantly impaired by reading and typing both Chinese and English text messages. Moreover, typing text messages distracted drivers more than reading them. Although the Chinese text messaging input system is more complicated than the English system, the use of Chinese did not cause a significantly different degree of distraction. Conclusion: Both reading and typing text messages while driving should be prohibited regardless of whether Chinese or English is used.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/trf-
dc.relation.ispartofTransportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License-
dc.titleYoung driver distraction by text messaging: A comparison of the effects of reading and typing text messages in Chinese versus English-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, SC: hhecwsc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, YC: liycjoey@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SC=rp00191-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.trf.2015.03.010-
dc.identifier.hkuros243634-
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.spage87-
dc.identifier.epage98-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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