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Article: World-class higher education and the emerging Chinese model of the university

TitleWorld-class higher education and the emerging Chinese model of the university
Authors
KeywordsWorld-class university
Chinese model
Chiniversity
Education policy
Governance
Higher education
Issue Date2012
Citation
Prospects, 2012, v. 42, n. 3, p. 319-339 How to Cite?
AbstractChina's recent quest to develop world-class universities is a significant phenomenon within the worldwide transformation of tertiary education. Taking a cultural approach and drawing on empirical findings, this article investigates the emerging Chinese model of the university, considering its key features and contributions to global communities. First, examining the rhetoric about world-class universities in varied societal contexts, it explores the institutional initiatives and government agendas involved in China's drive for global status. Then, using case studies of three universities moving toward mass higher education and world-class status, it shows the role played by their individual institutional initiative. It next describes key features of the emerging Chinese model of the university, including the core values of self-mastery and intellectual freedom, to show how it differs from the dominant Anglo-Saxon and American models but shares some features with the continental European and Japanese models of the university. The final section considers policy implications of the emerging Chinese model, its potential lessons for reform and practice, and its role in fostering vibrant democracies and global dialogue among civilizations in the future. © 2012 UNESCO IBE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210578
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.237

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jun-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-19T01:49:26Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-19T01:49:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationProspects, 2012, v. 42, n. 3, p. 319-339-
dc.identifier.issn0033-1538-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210578-
dc.description.abstractChina's recent quest to develop world-class universities is a significant phenomenon within the worldwide transformation of tertiary education. Taking a cultural approach and drawing on empirical findings, this article investigates the emerging Chinese model of the university, considering its key features and contributions to global communities. First, examining the rhetoric about world-class universities in varied societal contexts, it explores the institutional initiatives and government agendas involved in China's drive for global status. Then, using case studies of three universities moving toward mass higher education and world-class status, it shows the role played by their individual institutional initiative. It next describes key features of the emerging Chinese model of the university, including the core values of self-mastery and intellectual freedom, to show how it differs from the dominant Anglo-Saxon and American models but shares some features with the continental European and Japanese models of the university. The final section considers policy implications of the emerging Chinese model, its potential lessons for reform and practice, and its role in fostering vibrant democracies and global dialogue among civilizations in the future. © 2012 UNESCO IBE.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofProspects-
dc.subjectWorld-class university-
dc.subjectChinese model-
dc.subjectChiniversity-
dc.subjectEducation policy-
dc.subjectGovernance-
dc.subjectHigher education-
dc.titleWorld-class higher education and the emerging Chinese model of the university-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11125-012-9241-y-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867732053-
dc.identifier.hkuros262511-
dc.identifier.volume42-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage319-
dc.identifier.epage339-
dc.identifier.eissn1573-9090-

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