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Conference Paper: Dynamic sitting balance control tests in stroke survivors: a study of reliability and validity

TitleDynamic sitting balance control tests in stroke survivors: a study of reliability and validity
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Cardiovascular diseases
Issue Date2013
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/editors.asp?ref=1747-4930
Citation
The 24th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Society of Australia, Darwin, Australia, 31 July-02 August 2013. In International Journal of Stroke, 2013, v. 8 suppl. S1, p. 11-12 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Stroke survivors may have difficulties to maintain sitting balance due to the impaired control of trunk muscles. However, the temporal and spatial domains of dynamic sitting balance test for stroke survivors are lacking. AIMS: To investigate the reliability and validity of two sitting balance tests, namely limits of stability test (LOS) and sequential weight shifting test (SWS) in stroke survivors. METHODS: Eleven community-dwelling stroke survivors with onset for at least two years (mean time since stroke = 8.0 years [SD 4.0]) and 15 healthy subjects were recruited. Reaction time, maximum excursion, directional control of LOS, and total movement time and directional control of SWS were measured. Modified Function Reach Test (MFRT) and Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) were also conducted to correlate with LOS and SWS. RESULTS: Excellent test-retest reliability was demonstrated in reaction time (ICC[3,8] = 0.760) and maximum excursion (ICC[3,8] = 0.929) of LOS and total movement time of SWS (ICC[3,3] = 0.864) in stroke survivors. Known groups validity was only shown in reaction time of LOS (p = 0.039) between the two groups. Reaction time of LOS of stroke subjects was significantly correlated with MFRT (r = –0.684, p = 0.020), while directional control of LOS was significantly correlated with the dynamic sitting balance score (r = 0.846, p = 0.001) and total score (r = 0.817, p = 0.002) of TIS. For SWS, total movement time was significantly correlated with dynamic sitting balance score of TIS (r = –0.654, p = 0.029). CONCLUSION: Moderate to excellent test-retest reliability was found in LOS and SWS tests in stroke survivors. The convergence and discrimination perspectives of construct validity were established.
DescriptionThis free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: STROKE 2013 CONFERENCE. 24th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Society of Australia ... 2013
Oral abstracts
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210570
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.044
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.511

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, W-
dc.contributor.authorFong, SM-
dc.contributor.authorNg, SSM-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-18T03:00:04Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-18T03:00:04Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationThe 24th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Society of Australia, Darwin, Australia, 31 July-02 August 2013. In International Journal of Stroke, 2013, v. 8 suppl. S1, p. 11-12-
dc.identifier.issn1747-4930-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210570-
dc.descriptionThis free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: STROKE 2013 CONFERENCE. 24th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Society of Australia ... 2013-
dc.descriptionOral abstracts-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Stroke survivors may have difficulties to maintain sitting balance due to the impaired control of trunk muscles. However, the temporal and spatial domains of dynamic sitting balance test for stroke survivors are lacking. AIMS: To investigate the reliability and validity of two sitting balance tests, namely limits of stability test (LOS) and sequential weight shifting test (SWS) in stroke survivors. METHODS: Eleven community-dwelling stroke survivors with onset for at least two years (mean time since stroke = 8.0 years [SD 4.0]) and 15 healthy subjects were recruited. Reaction time, maximum excursion, directional control of LOS, and total movement time and directional control of SWS were measured. Modified Function Reach Test (MFRT) and Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) were also conducted to correlate with LOS and SWS. RESULTS: Excellent test-retest reliability was demonstrated in reaction time (ICC[3,8] = 0.760) and maximum excursion (ICC[3,8] = 0.929) of LOS and total movement time of SWS (ICC[3,3] = 0.864) in stroke survivors. Known groups validity was only shown in reaction time of LOS (p = 0.039) between the two groups. Reaction time of LOS of stroke subjects was significantly correlated with MFRT (r = –0.684, p = 0.020), while directional control of LOS was significantly correlated with the dynamic sitting balance score (r = 0.846, p = 0.001) and total score (r = 0.817, p = 0.002) of TIS. For SWS, total movement time was significantly correlated with dynamic sitting balance score of TIS (r = –0.654, p = 0.029). CONCLUSION: Moderate to excellent test-retest reliability was found in LOS and SWS tests in stroke survivors. The convergence and discrimination perspectives of construct validity were established.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/editors.asp?ref=1747-4930-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Stroke-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectCardiovascular diseases-
dc.titleDynamic sitting balance control tests in stroke survivors: a study of reliability and validity-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailFong, SM: smfong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNg, SSM: ssmng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityFong, SM=rp01759-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SSM=rp00767-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ijs.12142-
dc.identifier.hkuros243723-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. S1-
dc.identifier.spage11-
dc.identifier.epage12-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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