File Download
Supplementary

Conference Paper: The Role of Chinese Workers in the Church Missionary Society's Kwangsi-Hunan Mission, 1899-1951

TitleThe Role of Chinese Workers in the Church Missionary Society's Kwangsi-Hunan Mission, 1899-1951
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
The 2015 International Conference of The Shaping of Christianity in China, Oxford, UK., 21-22 May 2015. How to Cite?
AbstractThe Church Missionary Society initially focused its evangelical work in China on those areas that were close to the treaty ports where British influence was strongest, but from the early-1890s new mission stations were established in the more distant interior provinces of Sichuan (1891) and Guangxi (1899). In Sichuan, the CMS soon began co-operating with the China Inland Mission and several other Protestant societies that were already in the field, but by 1942 only 1,500 Chinese had been baptised, with eight of those ordained to the ministry. In Guangxi-Hunan, the CMS was more successful. Although this isolated mission remained the smallest of the CMS outposts in China, by the late 1930s more than 2,000 had been baptised. Although the mission had no Chinese clergy for its first twenty years, a number of lay workers, both men and women, became involved in evangelisation. By 1940, eleven Chinese priests and seventy-four lay workers were active in the diocese, in addition to the seventeen European missionaries employed by the CMS. The local mission synod entertained high hopes that the diocese would soon achieve self-sufficiency with the aid of such a large number of Chinese workers, but by 1941 Bishop Percy Stevens worried about the lack of Chinese clergy in training and the reduction in the number of lay-workers due to wartime cost-cutting measures. Likewise, early hopes for a Chinese women’s diaconate bore no fruit. This paper will chart the growth of a corps of Chinese mission workers in the diocese of Kwangsi-Hunan between its foundation in 1899 and the departure of the foreign missionaries in 1950, when eight Chinese clergymen were left in charge of the mission. The number of Chinese workers, the types of work undertaken by them, and the reasons for their changing fortunes will be discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210415

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCunich, P-
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-16T02:02:17Z-
dc.date.available2015-06-16T02:02:17Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe 2015 International Conference of The Shaping of Christianity in China, Oxford, UK., 21-22 May 2015.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210415-
dc.description.abstractThe Church Missionary Society initially focused its evangelical work in China on those areas that were close to the treaty ports where British influence was strongest, but from the early-1890s new mission stations were established in the more distant interior provinces of Sichuan (1891) and Guangxi (1899). In Sichuan, the CMS soon began co-operating with the China Inland Mission and several other Protestant societies that were already in the field, but by 1942 only 1,500 Chinese had been baptised, with eight of those ordained to the ministry. In Guangxi-Hunan, the CMS was more successful. Although this isolated mission remained the smallest of the CMS outposts in China, by the late 1930s more than 2,000 had been baptised. Although the mission had no Chinese clergy for its first twenty years, a number of lay workers, both men and women, became involved in evangelisation. By 1940, eleven Chinese priests and seventy-four lay workers were active in the diocese, in addition to the seventeen European missionaries employed by the CMS. The local mission synod entertained high hopes that the diocese would soon achieve self-sufficiency with the aid of such a large number of Chinese workers, but by 1941 Bishop Percy Stevens worried about the lack of Chinese clergy in training and the reduction in the number of lay-workers due to wartime cost-cutting measures. Likewise, early hopes for a Chinese women’s diaconate bore no fruit. This paper will chart the growth of a corps of Chinese mission workers in the diocese of Kwangsi-Hunan between its foundation in 1899 and the departure of the foreign missionaries in 1950, when eight Chinese clergymen were left in charge of the mission. The number of Chinese workers, the types of work undertaken by them, and the reasons for their changing fortunes will be discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Conference of The Shaping of Christianity in China-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleThe Role of Chinese Workers in the Church Missionary Society's Kwangsi-Hunan Mission, 1899-1951-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailCunich, P: cunich@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCunich, P=rp01191-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros243854-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats