File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Negative income effect on perception of long-term environmental risk

TitleNegative income effect on perception of long-term environmental risk
Authors
KeywordsPost-materialism
Developed country
Environmental concern
Income effect
Risk perception
Public perception
Issue Date2014
Citation
Ecological Economics, 2014, v. 107, p. 51-58 How to Cite?
AbstractThe notion that people with higher income are more concerned about environmental problems is deeply entrenched in economics and some other disciplines. Studies have shown a positive income effect on the intention to pay for environmental improvement. Perception of environmental risk, however, follows a different pattern of variation. This paper demonstrates a negative income effect, using data extracted from a cross-national social survey involving 36 countries. An inverse relationship is observed between people's reported income and their perception of long-term environmental risks associated with climate change, genetic modification of crops and the use of nuclear power. Lower-income individuals see the potential environmental consequences of these human interventions as extremely dangerous-more so than the higher-income ones. Richer people are relatively less concerned about the long-term environmental risks. A possible explanation is that material insecurity reinforces the feeling of risk and danger. People living under more difficult economic situation are more vulnerable and see greater danger. A key implication of these findings is that concern does not follow the ability to pay. People facing higher environmental risks are potentially less able to afford risk reduction support despite that they are likely to be in greater need for it. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210135
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.227
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.733

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, Alex Y.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-22T06:06:44Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-22T06:06:44Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationEcological Economics, 2014, v. 107, p. 51-58-
dc.identifier.issn0921-8009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210135-
dc.description.abstractThe notion that people with higher income are more concerned about environmental problems is deeply entrenched in economics and some other disciplines. Studies have shown a positive income effect on the intention to pay for environmental improvement. Perception of environmental risk, however, follows a different pattern of variation. This paper demonstrates a negative income effect, using data extracted from a cross-national social survey involving 36 countries. An inverse relationship is observed between people's reported income and their perception of long-term environmental risks associated with climate change, genetic modification of crops and the use of nuclear power. Lower-income individuals see the potential environmental consequences of these human interventions as extremely dangerous-more so than the higher-income ones. Richer people are relatively less concerned about the long-term environmental risks. A possible explanation is that material insecurity reinforces the feeling of risk and danger. People living under more difficult economic situation are more vulnerable and see greater danger. A key implication of these findings is that concern does not follow the ability to pay. People facing higher environmental risks are potentially less able to afford risk reduction support despite that they are likely to be in greater need for it. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEcological Economics-
dc.subjectPost-materialism-
dc.subjectDeveloped country-
dc.subjectEnvironmental concern-
dc.subjectIncome effect-
dc.subjectRisk perception-
dc.subjectPublic perception-
dc.titleNegative income effect on perception of long-term environmental risk-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.08.009-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84906653063-
dc.identifier.hkuros243562-
dc.identifier.volume107-
dc.identifier.spage51-
dc.identifier.epage58-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats