File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Household Preference and Financial Commitment to Flood Insurance in South-East Queensland

TitleHousehold Preference and Financial Commitment to Flood Insurance in South-East Queensland
Authors
Issue Date2013
Citation
Australian Economic Review, 2013, v. 46, n. 2, p. 160-175 How to Cite?
AbstractMany Queenslanders who were affected by the severe flood events in 2011 failed to recover their losses. Arrangements for flood insurance are under federal reviews in response to mounting public pressure. Against this backdrop, a household survey was conducted to solicit residents' preferences. The majority of interviewed residents favoured optional purchase of flood insurance. Non-insurance was associated with expectations of liberal assistance, indicating the possibility of 'moral hazard'. Willingness to pay for flood insurance was related to social influence. The non-insured households would spend more if they expected positive responses from people around. Attempts to reduce non-insurance should address aspects of social influence. © 2013 The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210114
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.552
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.357

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, Alex Y.-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-22T06:06:40Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-22T06:06:40Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationAustralian Economic Review, 2013, v. 46, n. 2, p. 160-175-
dc.identifier.issn0004-9018-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/210114-
dc.description.abstractMany Queenslanders who were affected by the severe flood events in 2011 failed to recover their losses. Arrangements for flood insurance are under federal reviews in response to mounting public pressure. Against this backdrop, a household survey was conducted to solicit residents' preferences. The majority of interviewed residents favoured optional purchase of flood insurance. Non-insurance was associated with expectations of liberal assistance, indicating the possibility of 'moral hazard'. Willingness to pay for flood insurance was related to social influence. The non-insured households would spend more if they expected positive responses from people around. Attempts to reduce non-insurance should address aspects of social influence. © 2013 The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian Economic Review-
dc.titleHousehold Preference and Financial Commitment to Flood Insurance in South-East Queensland-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-8462.2013.12009.x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84878444409-
dc.identifier.hkuros244414-
dc.identifier.volume46-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage160-
dc.identifier.epage175-
dc.identifier.eissn1467-8462-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats