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Article: Dissemination, divergence and establishment of H7N9 influenza viruses in China

TitleDissemination, divergence and establishment of H7N9 influenza viruses in China
Authors
Issue Date18-May-2015
Citation
Nature (In press), 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractSince 2013 the occurrence of human infections by a novel avian H7N9 influenza virus in China has demonstrated the continuing threat posed by zoonotic pathogens. Although the first outbreak wave that was centred on eastern China was seemingly averted, human infections recurred in October 2013 (refs 3, 4, 5, 6, 7). It is unclear how the H7N9 virus re-emerged and how it will develop further; potentially it may become a long-term threat to public health. Here we show that H7N9 viruses have spread from eastern to southern China and become persistent in chickens, which has led to the establishment of multiple regionally distinct lineages with different reassortant genotypes. Repeated introductions of viruses from Zhejiang to other provinces and the presence of H7N9 viruses at live poultry markets have fuelled the recurrence of human infections. This rapid expansion of the geographical distribution and genetic diversity of the H7N9 viruses poses a direct challenge to current disease control systems. Our results also suggest that H7N9 viruses have become enzootic in China and may spread beyond the region, following the pattern previously observed with H5N1 and H9N2 influenza viruses.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209985

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, TYen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCHAI, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorMA, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorHong, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuan, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LLMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebby, RJen_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, DKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, ECen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-18T03:39:17Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-18T03:39:17Z-
dc.date.issued2015-05-18-
dc.identifier.citationNature (In press), 2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209985-
dc.description.abstractSince 2013 the occurrence of human infections by a novel avian H7N9 influenza virus in China has demonstrated the continuing threat posed by zoonotic pathogens. Although the first outbreak wave that was centred on eastern China was seemingly averted, human infections recurred in October 2013 (refs 3, 4, 5, 6, 7). It is unclear how the H7N9 virus re-emerged and how it will develop further; potentially it may become a long-term threat to public health. Here we show that H7N9 viruses have spread from eastern to southern China and become persistent in chickens, which has led to the establishment of multiple regionally distinct lineages with different reassortant genotypes. Repeated introductions of viruses from Zhejiang to other provinces and the presence of H7N9 viruses at live poultry markets have fuelled the recurrence of human infections. This rapid expansion of the geographical distribution and genetic diversity of the H7N9 viruses poses a direct challenge to current disease control systems. Our results also suggest that H7N9 viruses have become enzootic in China and may spread beyond the region, following the pattern previously observed with H5N1 and H9N2 influenza viruses.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNatureen_US
dc.titleDissemination, divergence and establishment of H7N9 influenza viruses in Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TY: ttylam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, Y: yufish@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, L: lifeng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LLM: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSmith, DK: dsmith@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZhu, H: zhuhch@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TY=rp01733en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LLM=rp00484en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhu, H=rp01535en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nature14348en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros243187en_US

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