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postgraduate thesis: The Facebook paths to subjective well-being : effect of personality variables and perceived social support on Facebook use and subjective well-being among Form. 1 students in secondary school

TitleThe Facebook paths to subjective well-being : effect of personality variables and perceived social support on Facebook use and subjective well-being among Form. 1 students in secondary school
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chan, N. N. [陳諾廷]. (2014). The Facebook paths to subjective well-being : effect of personality variables and perceived social support on Facebook use and subjective well-being among Form. 1 students in secondary school. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5394192
AbstractThe present study explored the effect of personality and perceived social support on Facebook use and the effect of Facebook use on ones subjective well-being. Data was collected from 224 Form 1 studentsat two points in time that were three months apart. Results indicated that extraversion and perceived peers social support are significant predictors of Facebook usage for female students. No significant predictors could be found for male students. Furthermore, only number of Facebook friends of female students was found to have significant negative effect on subjective well-being. Problematic Internet use was found to have stronger effect on subjective well-being than Facebook usage. The limitations and future directions of the study are discussed.
DegreeMaster of Social Sciences
SubjectPersonality in adolescence
Well being
Junior high school students - Social networks
Dept/ProgramEducational Psychology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209672

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Nok-ting, Natalie-
dc.contributor.author陳諾廷-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-12T23:13:39Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-12T23:13:39Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationChan, N. N. [陳諾廷]. (2014). The Facebook paths to subjective well-being : effect of personality variables and perceived social support on Facebook use and subjective well-being among Form. 1 students in secondary school. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5394192-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209672-
dc.description.abstractThe present study explored the effect of personality and perceived social support on Facebook use and the effect of Facebook use on ones subjective well-being. Data was collected from 224 Form 1 studentsat two points in time that were three months apart. Results indicated that extraversion and perceived peers social support are significant predictors of Facebook usage for female students. No significant predictors could be found for male students. Furthermore, only number of Facebook friends of female students was found to have significant negative effect on subjective well-being. Problematic Internet use was found to have stronger effect on subjective well-being than Facebook usage. The limitations and future directions of the study are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshPersonality in adolescence-
dc.subject.lcshWell being-
dc.subject.lcshJunior high school students - Social networks-
dc.titleThe Facebook paths to subjective well-being : effect of personality variables and perceived social support on Facebook use and subjective well-being among Form. 1 students in secondary school-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5394192-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Social Sciences-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducational Psychology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5394192-

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