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postgraduate thesis: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) : a study of its clinical profile and parenting stress in Hong Kong

TitleAutism spectrum disorder (ASD) : a study of its clinical profile and parenting stress in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lai, W. R. [黎詠儀]. (2014). Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) : a study of its clinical profile and parenting stress in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5435548
AbstractObjectives: There has been a significant increase in the incidence rates and public awareness of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in recent years. The DSM-5’s latest modification of diagnostic criteria for ASD has also stimulated considerable debate. Despite the rising concerns, few studies have been conducted in the Chinese population of Hong Kong, especially among youth and adolescents. This study investigates the clinical profile of ASD in adolescents in Hong Kong. In addition to using screening instruments commonly used to assess specific ASD characteristics, other psychometric measures for internalizing and externalizing problems are employed to examine their associations with the ASD symptoms. It also assesses the extent to which different ASD symptoms and their associated features predict parenting stress. Methods: A total of 143 adolescents aged between 11 and 17 (M = 14.17; SD = 1.76) completed this study with their parents, including 71 adolescents with ASD and 72 typically developing adolescents. Adolescents completed two self-report measures of emotional symptoms: the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) and Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI). Their parents completed the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ), Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL), and Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale – Parent version (SCAS-P) for evaluating their child’s characteristics. Parents also completed the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) and Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) for measuring their own parenting stress. Results: All measures showed good to excellent internal consistency. They were as reliable and internally consistent as the original English versions. Parent reports in the ASD group were significantly higher than in the control group on all measures. Mean ASSQ scores in the ASD group fell within the clinical range. Optimal ASSQ cutoff scores were estimated using receiver operating characteristics analysis. ASD symptoms, as well as internalizing and externalizing problems, were found to be significant discriminators between the ASD group and the controls. In addition, parents reported that their child’s emotional and behaviour problems were more distressing than the ASD symptoms. Discussion: This study highlights the importance of evaluating specific ASD characteristics and their associated symptoms of emotional and behavioural disturbances. This study suggests an optimal cutoff score of 9 for the ASSQ in Hong Kong. However, there is a need to assess its generalizability using large-scale community samples and other childhood clinical conditions. Although the findings appear to support the revised DSM-5 taxonomy of ASD, they must be interpreted with caution. Future treatments should provide parents with adequate professional support for reducing parenting stress and helping them cope with their child’s social, emotional, and behavioural impairments. Conclusions: This study documents preliminary norms for a broad range of measures for adolescents with ASD in Hong Kong. It also provides a useful empirical basis for future investigations of the interplay between specific ASD characteristics and their associated features. Regarding treatment planning, this study postulates a comprehensive treatment model for adolescents with ASD to guide treatment research.
DegreeDoctor of Psychology
SubjectYouth with autism spectrum disorders - Psychology
Dept/ProgramClinical Psychology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209667

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, Wing-yee, Robby-
dc.contributor.author黎詠儀-
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-12T23:13:38Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-12T23:13:38Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationLai, W. R. [黎詠儀]. (2014). Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) : a study of its clinical profile and parenting stress in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5435548-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209667-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: There has been a significant increase in the incidence rates and public awareness of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in recent years. The DSM-5’s latest modification of diagnostic criteria for ASD has also stimulated considerable debate. Despite the rising concerns, few studies have been conducted in the Chinese population of Hong Kong, especially among youth and adolescents. This study investigates the clinical profile of ASD in adolescents in Hong Kong. In addition to using screening instruments commonly used to assess specific ASD characteristics, other psychometric measures for internalizing and externalizing problems are employed to examine their associations with the ASD symptoms. It also assesses the extent to which different ASD symptoms and their associated features predict parenting stress. Methods: A total of 143 adolescents aged between 11 and 17 (M = 14.17; SD = 1.76) completed this study with their parents, including 71 adolescents with ASD and 72 typically developing adolescents. Adolescents completed two self-report measures of emotional symptoms: the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS) and Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI). Their parents completed the Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ), Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL), and Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale – Parent version (SCAS-P) for evaluating their child’s characteristics. Parents also completed the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) and Parenting Stress Index-Short Form (PSI-SF) for measuring their own parenting stress. Results: All measures showed good to excellent internal consistency. They were as reliable and internally consistent as the original English versions. Parent reports in the ASD group were significantly higher than in the control group on all measures. Mean ASSQ scores in the ASD group fell within the clinical range. Optimal ASSQ cutoff scores were estimated using receiver operating characteristics analysis. ASD symptoms, as well as internalizing and externalizing problems, were found to be significant discriminators between the ASD group and the controls. In addition, parents reported that their child’s emotional and behaviour problems were more distressing than the ASD symptoms. Discussion: This study highlights the importance of evaluating specific ASD characteristics and their associated symptoms of emotional and behavioural disturbances. This study suggests an optimal cutoff score of 9 for the ASSQ in Hong Kong. However, there is a need to assess its generalizability using large-scale community samples and other childhood clinical conditions. Although the findings appear to support the revised DSM-5 taxonomy of ASD, they must be interpreted with caution. Future treatments should provide parents with adequate professional support for reducing parenting stress and helping them cope with their child’s social, emotional, and behavioural impairments. Conclusions: This study documents preliminary norms for a broad range of measures for adolescents with ASD in Hong Kong. It also provides a useful empirical basis for future investigations of the interplay between specific ASD characteristics and their associated features. Regarding treatment planning, this study postulates a comprehensive treatment model for adolescents with ASD to guide treatment research.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshYouth with autism spectrum disorders - Psychology-
dc.titleAutism spectrum disorder (ASD) : a study of its clinical profile and parenting stress in Hong Kong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5435548-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Psychology-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineClinical Psychology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5435548-

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