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postgraduate thesis: Neurogenesis in animal model of systemic lupus erythematosus

TitleNeurogenesis in animal model of systemic lupus erythematosus
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Leung, W. [梁瑋軒]. (2013). Neurogenesis in animal model of systemic lupus erythematosus. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5435639
AbstractSystemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease which is characterized by high level of autoantibody detected in the body. This disease is female predominant with a male to female ratio 1: 9. SLE could cause damage to different organ systems and central nervous system is one of them. Patients diagnosed with SLE could suffer from psychiatric problems like cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety. Neurogenesis refers to the process by which new neurons are generated. Although it has been widely reported that neurogenesis could be enhanced under pathological conditions such as stroke, Huntington’s disease and epilepsy, study focusing on the relationship between neurogenesis and SLE remains limited. In the present study, by using NZB/W F1 mice as the animal model of SLE, we could demonstrate that there was dramatic increase of neuronal precursor cells at the corpus callosum after the onset of SLE symptoms. Meanwhile, as IBA-1 positive cells and GFAP positive cells also increased significantly there, this suggested inflammation has taken place. I hypothesized there were upregulation of immunological factors after the onset of SLE symptoms and those factors were responsible for the neurogenesis. In my in vitro study, cytokine- interferon gamma (IFN gamma) has been shown to promote neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) to differentiate into neuronal linage but it did not obviously affect the cell proliferation and migration. For the other cytokine and chemokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), interleukin-8 (IL-8), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1alpha) and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC), all of them had no effect on NPC proliferation and differentiation. As far as we know, this is the first study to report SLE could enhance neurogenesis. Concerning the role of inflammation and IFN gamma on the neurogenesis in our case, it should be worth for further investigation, which will benefit future development of novel treatment targeting psychiatric symptoms in SLE.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectDevelopmental neurobiology
Systemic lupus erythematosus
Dept/ProgramAnatomy
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209497

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Wai-hin-
dc.contributor.author梁瑋軒-
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-23T23:10:53Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-23T23:10:53Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationLeung, W. [梁瑋軒]. (2013). Neurogenesis in animal model of systemic lupus erythematosus. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5435639-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209497-
dc.description.abstractSystemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease which is characterized by high level of autoantibody detected in the body. This disease is female predominant with a male to female ratio 1: 9. SLE could cause damage to different organ systems and central nervous system is one of them. Patients diagnosed with SLE could suffer from psychiatric problems like cognitive dysfunction, depression and anxiety. Neurogenesis refers to the process by which new neurons are generated. Although it has been widely reported that neurogenesis could be enhanced under pathological conditions such as stroke, Huntington’s disease and epilepsy, study focusing on the relationship between neurogenesis and SLE remains limited. In the present study, by using NZB/W F1 mice as the animal model of SLE, we could demonstrate that there was dramatic increase of neuronal precursor cells at the corpus callosum after the onset of SLE symptoms. Meanwhile, as IBA-1 positive cells and GFAP positive cells also increased significantly there, this suggested inflammation has taken place. I hypothesized there were upregulation of immunological factors after the onset of SLE symptoms and those factors were responsible for the neurogenesis. In my in vitro study, cytokine- interferon gamma (IFN gamma) has been shown to promote neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) to differentiate into neuronal linage but it did not obviously affect the cell proliferation and migration. For the other cytokine and chemokines, including interleukin-10 (IL-10), interleukin-8 (IL-8), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1alpha) and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (TARC), all of them had no effect on NPC proliferation and differentiation. As far as we know, this is the first study to report SLE could enhance neurogenesis. Concerning the role of inflammation and IFN gamma on the neurogenesis in our case, it should be worth for further investigation, which will benefit future development of novel treatment targeting psychiatric symptoms in SLE.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshDevelopmental neurobiology-
dc.subject.lcshSystemic lupus erythematosus-
dc.titleNeurogenesis in animal model of systemic lupus erythematosus-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5435639-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineAnatomy-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5435639-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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