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Article: Adolescent testosterone, muscle mass and glucose metabolism: Evidence from the 'Children of 1997' birth cohort in Hong Kong.

TitleAdolescent testosterone, muscle mass and glucose metabolism: Evidence from the 'Children of 1997' birth cohort in Hong Kong.
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/DME
Citation
Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK, 2015, v. 32 n. 4, p. 505-512 How to Cite?
AbstractAIMS: Diabetes rates are high in Asia despite relatively low rates of obesity, which might be related to lower muscle mass. Muscle mass plays an important role in glucose metabolism. Peak muscle mass is obtained in late adolescence. We tested the hypothesis that pubertal testosterone is negatively associated with glucose metabolism mediated by muscle mass. METHODS: Participants aged 15 years (278 boys and 223 girls) were recruited from the Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' birth cohort in 2012. Multivariable linear regression with multiple imputation and inverse probability weighting was used to examine the adjusted associations of pubertal testosterone with skeletal muscle index, body fat percentage, fasting glucose, insulin and homeostasis model of assessment - insulin resistance. RESULTS: Total testosterone was negatively associated with fasting glucose (-0.008, 95% confidence interval -0.015 to -0.002), insulin (-0.43, 95% confidence interval -0.56 to -0.30) and insulin and homeostasis model of assessment - insulin resistance (-0.09, 95% confidence interval -0.12 to -0.06) adjusted for sex, birth weight, highest parental education, mother's place of birth and physical activity. These associations were attenuated by additional adjustment for skeletal mass index or body fat percentage. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent glucose metabolism may be influenced by testosterone, perhaps partially via skeletal muscle mass. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209404
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.152
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.654

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHou, WWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, MAen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-17T05:15:45Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-17T05:15:45Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationDiabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK, 2015, v. 32 n. 4, p. 505-512en_US
dc.identifier.issn0742-3071en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209404-
dc.description.abstractAIMS: Diabetes rates are high in Asia despite relatively low rates of obesity, which might be related to lower muscle mass. Muscle mass plays an important role in glucose metabolism. Peak muscle mass is obtained in late adolescence. We tested the hypothesis that pubertal testosterone is negatively associated with glucose metabolism mediated by muscle mass. METHODS: Participants aged 15 years (278 boys and 223 girls) were recruited from the Hong Kong's 'Children of 1997' birth cohort in 2012. Multivariable linear regression with multiple imputation and inverse probability weighting was used to examine the adjusted associations of pubertal testosterone with skeletal muscle index, body fat percentage, fasting glucose, insulin and homeostasis model of assessment - insulin resistance. RESULTS: Total testosterone was negatively associated with fasting glucose (-0.008, 95% confidence interval -0.015 to -0.002), insulin (-0.43, 95% confidence interval -0.56 to -0.30) and insulin and homeostasis model of assessment - insulin resistance (-0.09, 95% confidence interval -0.12 to -0.06) adjusted for sex, birth weight, highest parental education, mother's place of birth and physical activity. These associations were attenuated by additional adjustment for skeletal mass index or body fat percentage. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent glucose metabolism may be influenced by testosterone, perhaps partially via skeletal muscle mass. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/DMEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UKen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.comen_US
dc.titleAdolescent testosterone, muscle mass and glucose metabolism: Evidence from the 'Children of 1997' birth cohort in Hong Kong.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTse, MA: matse@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/dme.12602en_US
dc.identifier.pmid25307068en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242772en_US
dc.identifier.volume32en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage505en_US
dc.identifier.epage512en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US

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