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Article: Productivity links morphology, symbiont specificity, and bleaching in the evolution of Caribbean octocoral symbioses

TitleProductivity links morphology, symbiont specificity, and bleaching in the evolution of Caribbean octocoral symbioses
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
The ISME Journal, 2015 How to Cite?
AbstractMany cnidarians host endosymbiotic dinoflagellates from the genus Symbiodinium. It is generally assumed that the symbiosis is mutualistic, where the host benefits from symbiont photosynthesis while providing protection and photosynthetic substrates. Diverse assemblages of symbiotic gorgonian octocorals can be found in hard bottom communities throughout the Caribbean. While current research has focused on the phylo- and population genetics of gorgonian symbiont types and their photo-physiology, relatively less work has focused on biogeochemical benefits conferred to the host and how these benefits vary across host species. Here, we examine this symbiosis among 11 gorgonian species collected in Bocas del Toro, Panama. By coupling light and dark bottle incubations (P/R) with 13C-bicarbonate tracers, we quantified the link between holobiont oxygen metabolism with carbon assimilation and translocation from symbiont to host. Our data show that P/R varied among species, and was correlated with colony morphology and polyp size. Sea fans and sea plumes were net autotrophs (P/R > 1.5) while nine species of sea rods were net heterotrophs with most below compensation (P/R < 1.0). 13C assimilation corroborated the P/R results, and maximum δ13Chost values were strongly correlated with polyp size, indicating higher productivity by colonies with high polyp SA:V. A survey of gorgonian-Symbiodinium associations revealed that productive species maintain specialized, obligate symbioses and are more resistant to coral bleaching, whereas generalist and facultative associations are common among sea rods that have higher bleaching sensitivities. Overall, productivity and polyp size had strong phylogenetic signals with carbon fixation and polyp size showing evidence of trait covariance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209370

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBaker, DMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, CJen_US
dc.contributor.authorKnowlton, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorThacker, RWen_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorFogel, MLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-17T05:11:25Z-
dc.date.available2015-04-17T05:11:25Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationThe ISME Journal, 2015en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/209370-
dc.description.abstractMany cnidarians host endosymbiotic dinoflagellates from the genus Symbiodinium. It is generally assumed that the symbiosis is mutualistic, where the host benefits from symbiont photosynthesis while providing protection and photosynthetic substrates. Diverse assemblages of symbiotic gorgonian octocorals can be found in hard bottom communities throughout the Caribbean. While current research has focused on the phylo- and population genetics of gorgonian symbiont types and their photo-physiology, relatively less work has focused on biogeochemical benefits conferred to the host and how these benefits vary across host species. Here, we examine this symbiosis among 11 gorgonian species collected in Bocas del Toro, Panama. By coupling light and dark bottle incubations (P/R) with 13C-bicarbonate tracers, we quantified the link between holobiont oxygen metabolism with carbon assimilation and translocation from symbiont to host. Our data show that P/R varied among species, and was correlated with colony morphology and polyp size. Sea fans and sea plumes were net autotrophs (P/R > 1.5) while nine species of sea rods were net heterotrophs with most below compensation (P/R < 1.0). 13C assimilation corroborated the P/R results, and maximum δ13Chost values were strongly correlated with polyp size, indicating higher productivity by colonies with high polyp SA:V. A survey of gorgonian-Symbiodinium associations revealed that productive species maintain specialized, obligate symbioses and are more resistant to coral bleaching, whereas generalist and facultative associations are common among sea rods that have higher bleaching sensitivities. Overall, productivity and polyp size had strong phylogenetic signals with carbon fixation and polyp size showing evidence of trait covariance.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe ISME Journalen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleProductivity links morphology, symbiont specificity, and bleaching in the evolution of Caribbean octocoral symbiosesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBaker, DM: dmbaker@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBaker, DM=rp01712en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ismej.2015.71-
dc.identifier.hkuros242907en_US

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