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Article: The interplay of dental pulp stem cells and endothelial cells in an injectable peptide hydrogel on angiogenesis and pulp regeneration in vivo

TitleThe interplay of dental pulp stem cells and endothelial cells in an injectable peptide hydrogel on angiogenesis and pulp regeneration in vivo
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Tissue Engineering Part A, 2015, v. 21 n. 3-4, p. 550-563 How to Cite?
AbstractSecuring an adequate blood supply for the survival of cell transplants is critical for a successful outcome in tissue engineering. Interactions between endothelial and progenitor/stem cells are important for vascularization of regenerating tissue. Recently, self-assembling peptide nanofibers were described as a promising environment for pulp regeneration due to their synthetic nature and controlled physicochemical properties. In this study, the peptide hydrogel PuraMatrix™ was used as a scaffold system to investigate the role of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in triggering angiogenesis and the potential for regenerating vascularized pulp in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), DPSCs, or cocultures of both cell types were encapsulated in three-dimensional PuraMatrix. The peptide nanofiber microenvironment supported cell survival, cell migration, and capillary network formation in the absence of exogenous growth factors. DPSCs increased early vascular network formation by facilitating the migration of HUVECs and by increasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Both the DPSC-monoculture and coculture groups exhibited vascularized pulp-like tissue with patches of osteodentin after transplantation in mice. The cocultured groups exhibited more extracellular matrix, vascularization, and mineralization than the DPSC-monocultures in vivo. The DPSCs play a critical role in initial angiogenesis, whereas coordinated efforts by the HUVECs and DPSCs are required to achieve a balance between extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization. The findings of this study also highlighted the importance of a microenvironment that supports cell-cell interactions and cell migration, which contribute to successful dental pulp regeneration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208675
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.500

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDissanayaka, WLen_US
dc.contributor.authorHargreaves, KMen_US
dc.contributor.authorJin, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-18T09:03:08Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-18T09:03:08Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationTissue Engineering Part A, 2015, v. 21 n. 3-4, p. 550-563en_US
dc.identifier.issn1937-3341-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208675-
dc.description.abstractSecuring an adequate blood supply for the survival of cell transplants is critical for a successful outcome in tissue engineering. Interactions between endothelial and progenitor/stem cells are important for vascularization of regenerating tissue. Recently, self-assembling peptide nanofibers were described as a promising environment for pulp regeneration due to their synthetic nature and controlled physicochemical properties. In this study, the peptide hydrogel PuraMatrix™ was used as a scaffold system to investigate the role of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in triggering angiogenesis and the potential for regenerating vascularized pulp in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), DPSCs, or cocultures of both cell types were encapsulated in three-dimensional PuraMatrix. The peptide nanofiber microenvironment supported cell survival, cell migration, and capillary network formation in the absence of exogenous growth factors. DPSCs increased early vascular network formation by facilitating the migration of HUVECs and by increasing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Both the DPSC-monoculture and coculture groups exhibited vascularized pulp-like tissue with patches of osteodentin after transplantation in mice. The cocultured groups exhibited more extracellular matrix, vascularization, and mineralization than the DPSC-monocultures in vivo. The DPSCs play a critical role in initial angiogenesis, whereas coordinated efforts by the HUVECs and DPSCs are required to achieve a balance between extracellular matrix deposition and mineralization. The findings of this study also highlighted the importance of a microenvironment that supports cell-cell interactions and cell migration, which contribute to successful dental pulp regeneration.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTissue Engineering Part Aen_US
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.rightsFinal publication is available from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.tea.2014.0154-
dc.titleThe interplay of dental pulp stem cells and endothelial cells in an injectable peptide hydrogel on angiogenesis and pulp regeneration in vivoen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDissanayaka, WL: warunad@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJin, L: ljjin@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP: lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, C: zhangcf@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/ten.tea.2014.0154en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84923301242-
dc.identifier.hkuros242661en_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage550en_US
dc.identifier.epage563en_US

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