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Article: Conrad and the Comic Turn

TitleConrad and the Comic Turn
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=VLC
Citation
Victorian Literature and Culture, 2015, v. 43 n. 1, p. 149-168 How to Cite?
AbstractConrad and the Comic Turn This essay argues for the neglected importance of forms of popular theatre, and especially music-hall, for Conrad’s education in English culture, and for the style of comic situations, and comic dialogue, in his fiction. The early novel The Nigger of the ‘Narcissus’ is shown to be particularly imbued with memories of the music-hall, in its theatrical topography, its crew who are both audience and participatory chorus of the main drama, and in its dramatically-lit cynosure Wait. “An Outpost of Progress” is examined as a variation on the “turn” of comic pals, and for its elements of slapstick farce. Versions of theatrical comic sketches are found embedded other fictions, including profoundly tragic ones, such as The Secret Agent. Finally, music-hall’s adeptness at creating comedy and evading censorship and censure through the use of innuendo, suggestion, irony and double entendre is found often to be a principle of Conradian dialogue and even narration, in such stories as “Heart of Darkness”.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208669

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKerr, DWFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-18T09:02:38Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-18T09:02:38Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationVictorian Literature and Culture, 2015, v. 43 n. 1, p. 149-168en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208669-
dc.description.abstractConrad and the Comic Turn This essay argues for the neglected importance of forms of popular theatre, and especially music-hall, for Conrad’s education in English culture, and for the style of comic situations, and comic dialogue, in his fiction. The early novel The Nigger of the ‘Narcissus’ is shown to be particularly imbued with memories of the music-hall, in its theatrical topography, its crew who are both audience and participatory chorus of the main drama, and in its dramatically-lit cynosure Wait. “An Outpost of Progress” is examined as a variation on the “turn” of comic pals, and for its elements of slapstick farce. Versions of theatrical comic sketches are found embedded other fictions, including profoundly tragic ones, such as The Secret Agent. Finally, music-hall’s adeptness at creating comedy and evading censorship and censure through the use of innuendo, suggestion, irony and double entendre is found often to be a principle of Conradian dialogue and even narration, in such stories as “Heart of Darkness”.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=VLCen_US
dc.relation.ispartofVictorian Literature and Cultureen_US
dc.rightsVictorian Literature and Culture . Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleConrad and the Comic Turnen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKerr, DWF: kerrdw@hku.hken_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1060150314000394-
dc.identifier.hkuros242640en_US
dc.identifier.volume43en_US
dc.identifier.spage149en_US
dc.identifier.epage168en_US
dc.publisher.placeCambridgeen_US

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