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postgraduate thesis: Exploring the role of movement specific reinvestment during practice and performance of tasks of varying complexity

TitleExploring the role of movement specific reinvestment during practice and performance of tasks of varying complexity
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Malhotra, N. D.. (2014). Exploring the role of movement specific reinvestment during practice and performance of tasks of varying complexity. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5387987
AbstractSix experiments were conducted in order to examine the role of movement specific reinvestment in performance of a range of tasks of varying complexity under different performance contexts. The first experiment investigated the role of movement specific reinvestment in performance of a fundamental laparoscopic skill under time pressure. It was found that individuals with a lower propensity for movement specific reinvestment were able to meet task demands by performing faster under time pressure than individuals with a higher propensity for movement specific reinvestment. Although movement specific reinvestment is often treated as a uni-dimensional construct, it is comprised of two dimensions of conscious processing; movement self-consciousness and conscious motor processing. These dimensions appear to exert a differential influence on performance in different contexts. The second experiment therefore investigated the differential influence of the two dimensions of movement specific reinvestment on performance of a fundamental laparoscopic skill early and later in practice and on performance of a more complex, cross-handed laparoscopy task. Movement self-consciousness was found to play a more dominant role early and later in practice of a relatively simple, fundamental, laparoscopic skill than conscious motor processing, which played a more dominant role in performance of a more complex, cross-handed laparoscopic skill. The third and fourth experiments examined the differential influence of the two dimensions of movement specific reinvestment on a complex golf-putting skill early and later in practice (Experiment 3) and under low- and high-anxiety conditions (Experiment 4). Experiments 3 and 4 also examined the kinematic mechanisms underlying the influence of the two dimensions on putting performance. Findings from Experiment 3 revealed that movement self-consciousness and conscious motor processing positively influenced putting performance early in practice, when learners were consciously engaged in the control of movements. However, later in practice movement self-consciousness alone positively influenced putting performance. Analysis of kinematic measures suggested that reduced variability of both impact velocity and putter face angle at impact mediated the positive influence of both movement self-consciousness and conscious motor processing on putting performance. Findings from Experiment 4 revealed that movement self-consciousness positively influenced performance in the low-anxiety condition (and appeared to reduce variability of impact velocity), but not in the high-anxiety condition. It was argued that the attention demanding nature of anxiety (Eysenck & Calvo, 1992) potentially subdued the influence of movement self-consciousness under high-anxiety conditions. The fifth experiment confirmed this proposition as the positive influence of movement self-consciousness on quiet standing performance was no longer evident when an attention demanding dual-task was performed concurrently with a primary quiet standing task. The final experiment examined the unique influence of the two dimensions on laparoscopic performance during practice and under anxiety in a real-world anxiety provoking situation, the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) (Muldoon, Biesty, & Smith, 2014; Nasir et al., in press). The findings of the six experiments are discussed within the framework of the Theory of Reinvestment (e.g., Masters, 1992; Masters & Maxwell, 2008).
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectSports - Psychological aspects
Performance - Psychological aspects
Dept/ProgramHuman Performance
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208559

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMalhotra, Neha Deepak-
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-13T01:43:54Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-13T01:43:54Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationMalhotra, N. D.. (2014). Exploring the role of movement specific reinvestment during practice and performance of tasks of varying complexity. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5387987-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208559-
dc.description.abstractSix experiments were conducted in order to examine the role of movement specific reinvestment in performance of a range of tasks of varying complexity under different performance contexts. The first experiment investigated the role of movement specific reinvestment in performance of a fundamental laparoscopic skill under time pressure. It was found that individuals with a lower propensity for movement specific reinvestment were able to meet task demands by performing faster under time pressure than individuals with a higher propensity for movement specific reinvestment. Although movement specific reinvestment is often treated as a uni-dimensional construct, it is comprised of two dimensions of conscious processing; movement self-consciousness and conscious motor processing. These dimensions appear to exert a differential influence on performance in different contexts. The second experiment therefore investigated the differential influence of the two dimensions of movement specific reinvestment on performance of a fundamental laparoscopic skill early and later in practice and on performance of a more complex, cross-handed laparoscopy task. Movement self-consciousness was found to play a more dominant role early and later in practice of a relatively simple, fundamental, laparoscopic skill than conscious motor processing, which played a more dominant role in performance of a more complex, cross-handed laparoscopic skill. The third and fourth experiments examined the differential influence of the two dimensions of movement specific reinvestment on a complex golf-putting skill early and later in practice (Experiment 3) and under low- and high-anxiety conditions (Experiment 4). Experiments 3 and 4 also examined the kinematic mechanisms underlying the influence of the two dimensions on putting performance. Findings from Experiment 3 revealed that movement self-consciousness and conscious motor processing positively influenced putting performance early in practice, when learners were consciously engaged in the control of movements. However, later in practice movement self-consciousness alone positively influenced putting performance. Analysis of kinematic measures suggested that reduced variability of both impact velocity and putter face angle at impact mediated the positive influence of both movement self-consciousness and conscious motor processing on putting performance. Findings from Experiment 4 revealed that movement self-consciousness positively influenced performance in the low-anxiety condition (and appeared to reduce variability of impact velocity), but not in the high-anxiety condition. It was argued that the attention demanding nature of anxiety (Eysenck & Calvo, 1992) potentially subdued the influence of movement self-consciousness under high-anxiety conditions. The fifth experiment confirmed this proposition as the positive influence of movement self-consciousness on quiet standing performance was no longer evident when an attention demanding dual-task was performed concurrently with a primary quiet standing task. The final experiment examined the unique influence of the two dimensions on laparoscopic performance during practice and under anxiety in a real-world anxiety provoking situation, the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) (Muldoon, Biesty, & Smith, 2014; Nasir et al., in press). The findings of the six experiments are discussed within the framework of the Theory of Reinvestment (e.g., Masters, 1992; Masters & Maxwell, 2008).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshSports - Psychological aspects-
dc.subject.lcshPerformance - Psychological aspects-
dc.titleExploring the role of movement specific reinvestment during practice and performance of tasks of varying complexity-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5387987-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineHuman Performance-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5387987-

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