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postgraduate thesis: Ageing in place : a case study of elderly housing in public rental housing estate in Hong Kong : Kwai Shing West Estate

TitleAgeing in place : a case study of elderly housing in public rental housing estate in Hong Kong : Kwai Shing West Estate
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Tam, Y. D. [譚婉珊]. (2014). Ageing in place : a case study of elderly housing in public rental housing estate in Hong Kong : Kwai Shing West Estate. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5372741
AbstractLike most of the developed cities in the world, Hong Kong has to prepare for the challenges of ageing population after decades of sweet economic growth brought by the baby boom after World War II. According to the projection by the Census and Statistics Department carried out in 2011, the number of people aged 65 and above will rise significantly from 13% in 2011 to 30% in 2041. While almost 40% of the elderly are living in public housing; and numerous researches suggest “Ageing in place” is the unarguable preference of the elderly for them to live with dignity and autonomy in their familiar community, this study is therefore focusing on two questions: First, whether the prevailing housing provisions and policies could facilitate ageing in place for the elderly in the public rental housing estates. Second, what is the way forward for successful and sustainable ageing in place in public rental housing in the coming era of ageing. Three key elements for ageing in place are identified including adequate provision of affordable housing; suitable “environment” meeting the elderly’s needs in physical and social aspects; and a living arrangement assisting formal care by professionals and informal cares by families. Empirical findings concluded that the accessibility of public rental housing for the elderly in the past decade was adequate. However, analysis on the trends of demand and supply for waiting list applicants revealed the potential shortage in future by reference to the lengthening waiting time despite the priority schemes for the elderly all along. The main reasons are the strong resistance to new estate development; and ageing of existing stock. A thorough research in the current housing policies revealed that the Hong Kong Housing Authority has implemented vigorous maintenance and improvements works; and numerous management policies in facilitating the aged people living in public rental housing estates. Their effectiveness was assessed through a case study on a representative old public rental housing estate viz. Kwai Shing West Estate comprising a questionnaire survey with a sample of 49 elderly respondents; field study on the estate facilities and services; and interviews with five knowledgeable stakeholders of government official, resident representative, elderly services providers and District Councillor sharing insights from different perspectives. Case study findings supported that the elderly were satisfied with their living conditions and community in public rental housing estate. However, they generally looked for better transport; more recreational facilities and open spaces; as well as social gathering opportunities to enhance their social lives. On the dark side, the social and community support services were inadequate as limited by the historical establishment and imbalanced allocation amongst estates. The current policies have also failed to identify and assist those “Hidden” elderly. Furthermore, the elderly were not much aware of the social services and housing policies fostering harmonious families. At last, the deteriorating trend of co-residence of the young and elder generations has been weakening the family support and increasing demand on social services of daily living assistance. Based on the empirical findings in my study, several recommendations on the way forward in enhancing ageing in place in public rental housing are attempted.
DegreeMaster of Housing Management
SubjectHong Kong - Older people - Housing - China - Case studies
Dept/ProgramHousing Management
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208515

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTam, Yuen-shan, Dilys-
dc.contributor.author譚婉珊-
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-11T23:10:23Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-11T23:10:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationTam, Y. D. [譚婉珊]. (2014). Ageing in place : a case study of elderly housing in public rental housing estate in Hong Kong : Kwai Shing West Estate. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5372741-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208515-
dc.description.abstractLike most of the developed cities in the world, Hong Kong has to prepare for the challenges of ageing population after decades of sweet economic growth brought by the baby boom after World War II. According to the projection by the Census and Statistics Department carried out in 2011, the number of people aged 65 and above will rise significantly from 13% in 2011 to 30% in 2041. While almost 40% of the elderly are living in public housing; and numerous researches suggest “Ageing in place” is the unarguable preference of the elderly for them to live with dignity and autonomy in their familiar community, this study is therefore focusing on two questions: First, whether the prevailing housing provisions and policies could facilitate ageing in place for the elderly in the public rental housing estates. Second, what is the way forward for successful and sustainable ageing in place in public rental housing in the coming era of ageing. Three key elements for ageing in place are identified including adequate provision of affordable housing; suitable “environment” meeting the elderly’s needs in physical and social aspects; and a living arrangement assisting formal care by professionals and informal cares by families. Empirical findings concluded that the accessibility of public rental housing for the elderly in the past decade was adequate. However, analysis on the trends of demand and supply for waiting list applicants revealed the potential shortage in future by reference to the lengthening waiting time despite the priority schemes for the elderly all along. The main reasons are the strong resistance to new estate development; and ageing of existing stock. A thorough research in the current housing policies revealed that the Hong Kong Housing Authority has implemented vigorous maintenance and improvements works; and numerous management policies in facilitating the aged people living in public rental housing estates. Their effectiveness was assessed through a case study on a representative old public rental housing estate viz. Kwai Shing West Estate comprising a questionnaire survey with a sample of 49 elderly respondents; field study on the estate facilities and services; and interviews with five knowledgeable stakeholders of government official, resident representative, elderly services providers and District Councillor sharing insights from different perspectives. Case study findings supported that the elderly were satisfied with their living conditions and community in public rental housing estate. However, they generally looked for better transport; more recreational facilities and open spaces; as well as social gathering opportunities to enhance their social lives. On the dark side, the social and community support services were inadequate as limited by the historical establishment and imbalanced allocation amongst estates. The current policies have also failed to identify and assist those “Hidden” elderly. Furthermore, the elderly were not much aware of the social services and housing policies fostering harmonious families. At last, the deteriorating trend of co-residence of the young and elder generations has been weakening the family support and increasing demand on social services of daily living assistance. Based on the empirical findings in my study, several recommendations on the way forward in enhancing ageing in place in public rental housing are attempted.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshHong Kong - Older people - Housing - China - Case studies-
dc.titleAgeing in place : a case study of elderly housing in public rental housing estate in Hong Kong : Kwai Shing West Estate-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5372741-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Housing Management-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineHousing Management-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5372741-

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