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Article: An emic lens into online learning environments in PBL in undergraduate dentistry

TitleAn emic lens into online learning environments in PBL in undergraduate dentistry
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Pedagogies: An International Journal, 2015, v. 10 n. 1, p. 22-37 How to Cite?
AbstractWhilst face-to-face tutorial group interaction has been the focus of quantitative and qualitative studies in problem-based learning (PBL), little work has explored the independent learning phase of the PBL cycle from an interactionist perspective. An interactional ethnographic logic of inquiry guided collection and analysis of video recordings and learning artefacts across tied cycles of activity (multiple days and times) to identify evidence of learning in an undergraduate health sciences curriculum. An additional stimulated recall interview provided further emic perspectives of online learning during a self-directed learning session within the PBL cycle of activity. This approach guided the identification of key events, intertextual ties across chains of events, and the transcribing and mapping of changes in problem-solving across events, actors and times. Records included problem-based sessions in dental education, overtime video records, transcriptions, and analysis of online work and reflections on accounts constructed by undergraduate dental students. Key findings examined the role of online resources in supporting PBL curriculum design as well as provided “emic” insights into student knowledge building processes. Interactionist analyses enabled the unfolding, recursive and re-iterative nature of disciplinary knowledge and identity construction across time and contexts through the use of more contextualized forms of representation as “evidence”.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208337

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBridges, SMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-23T08:26:31Z-
dc.date.available2015-02-23T08:26:31Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationPedagogies: An International Journal, 2015, v. 10 n. 1, p. 22-37en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208337-
dc.description.abstractWhilst face-to-face tutorial group interaction has been the focus of quantitative and qualitative studies in problem-based learning (PBL), little work has explored the independent learning phase of the PBL cycle from an interactionist perspective. An interactional ethnographic logic of inquiry guided collection and analysis of video recordings and learning artefacts across tied cycles of activity (multiple days and times) to identify evidence of learning in an undergraduate health sciences curriculum. An additional stimulated recall interview provided further emic perspectives of online learning during a self-directed learning session within the PBL cycle of activity. This approach guided the identification of key events, intertextual ties across chains of events, and the transcribing and mapping of changes in problem-solving across events, actors and times. Records included problem-based sessions in dental education, overtime video records, transcriptions, and analysis of online work and reflections on accounts constructed by undergraduate dental students. Key findings examined the role of online resources in supporting PBL curriculum design as well as provided “emic” insights into student knowledge building processes. Interactionist analyses enabled the unfolding, recursive and re-iterative nature of disciplinary knowledge and identity construction across time and contexts through the use of more contextualized forms of representation as “evidence”.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPedagogies: An International Journalen_US
dc.titleAn emic lens into online learning environments in PBL in undergraduate dentistryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailBridges, SM: sbridges@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityBridges, SM=rp00048en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1554480X.2014.999771en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242338en_US
dc.identifier.spage22en_US
dc.identifier.epage37en_US

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