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Article: China as dystopia: Cultural imaginings through translation

TitleChina as dystopia: Cultural imaginings through translation
Authors
Issue Date2015
PublisherTaylor and Francis.
Citation
Translation Studies, 2015, v. 8 n. 3, p. 251-268 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article explores how China is represented in English translations of contemporary Chinese literature. It seeks to uncover the discourses at work in framing this literature for reception by an Anglophone readership, and to suggest how these discourses dovetail with meta-narratives on China circulating in the West. In addition to asking “what gets translated”, the article is interested in how Chinese authors and their works are positioned, marketed, and commodified in the West through the discursive material that surrounds a translated book. Drawing on English translations of works by Yan Lianke, Ma Jian, Chan Koonchung, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Mo Yan, the article argues that literary translation is part of a wider programme of Anglophone textual practices that renders China an overdetermined sign pointing to a repressive, dystopic Other. The knowledge structures governing these textual practices circumscribe the ways in which China is imagined and articulated, thereby producing a discursive China.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208333

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, TKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-23T08:25:31Z-
dc.date.available2015-02-23T08:25:31Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationTranslation Studies, 2015, v. 8 n. 3, p. 251-268en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208333-
dc.description.abstractThis article explores how China is represented in English translations of contemporary Chinese literature. It seeks to uncover the discourses at work in framing this literature for reception by an Anglophone readership, and to suggest how these discourses dovetail with meta-narratives on China circulating in the West. In addition to asking “what gets translated”, the article is interested in how Chinese authors and their works are positioned, marketed, and commodified in the West through the discursive material that surrounds a translated book. Drawing on English translations of works by Yan Lianke, Ma Jian, Chan Koonchung, Yu Hua, Su Tong, and Mo Yan, the article argues that literary translation is part of a wider programme of Anglophone textual practices that renders China an overdetermined sign pointing to a repressive, dystopic Other. The knowledge structures governing these textual practices circumscribe the ways in which China is imagined and articulated, thereby producing a discursive China.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor and Francis.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofTranslation Studiesen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleChina as dystopia: Cultural imaginings through translationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, TK: leetk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TK=rp01612en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14781700.2015.1009937en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242380en_US
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage251-
dc.identifier.epage268-

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