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Article: Noise Levels In An Urban Asian School Environment

TitleNoise Levels In An Urban Asian School Environment
Authors
Issue Date2015
Citation
Noise & Health, 2015, v. 17, p. 48-55 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground noise is known to adversely affect speech perception and speech recognition. High levels of background noise in school classrooms may affect student learning, especially for those pupils who are learning in a second language. The current study aimed to determine the noise level and teacher speech-to-noise ratio (SNR) in Hong Kong classrooms. Noise level was measured in 146 occupied classrooms in 37 schools, including kindergartens, primary schools, secondary schools and special schools, in Hong Kong. The mean noise levels in occupied kindergarten, primary school, secondary school and special school classrooms all exceeded recommended maximum noise levels, and noise reduction measures were seldom used in classrooms. The measured SNRs were not optimal and could have adverse implications for student learning and teachers’ vocal health. Schools in urban Asian environments are advised to consider noise reduction measures in classrooms to better comply with recommended maximum noise levels for classrooms.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208285

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KMKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, EPMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYiu, EMLen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcPherson, DBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-23T08:18:14Z-
dc.date.available2015-02-23T08:18:14Z-
dc.date.issued2015en_US
dc.identifier.citationNoise & Health, 2015, v. 17, p. 48-55en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208285-
dc.description.abstractBackground noise is known to adversely affect speech perception and speech recognition. High levels of background noise in school classrooms may affect student learning, especially for those pupils who are learning in a second language. The current study aimed to determine the noise level and teacher speech-to-noise ratio (SNR) in Hong Kong classrooms. Noise level was measured in 146 occupied classrooms in 37 schools, including kindergartens, primary schools, secondary schools and special schools, in Hong Kong. The mean noise levels in occupied kindergarten, primary school, secondary school and special school classrooms all exceeded recommended maximum noise levels, and noise reduction measures were seldom used in classrooms. The measured SNRs were not optimal and could have adverse implications for student learning and teachers’ vocal health. Schools in urban Asian environments are advised to consider noise reduction measures in classrooms to better comply with recommended maximum noise levels for classrooms.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNoise & Healthen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleNoise Levels In An Urban Asian School Environmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KMK: karencmk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMa, EPM: estella.ma@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, EML: eyiu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcPherson, DB: dbmcpher@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KMK=rp00893en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMa, EPM=rp00933en_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, EML=rp00981en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcPherson, DB=rp00937en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.4103/1463-1741.149580en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros242298en_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.spage48en_US
dc.identifier.epage55en_US

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