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Article: Gendered power in eating habits: insight into childhood obesity in a Chinese family context

TitleGendered power in eating habits: insight into childhood obesity in a Chinese family context
Authors
KeywordsChinese families
Eating
Gender
Power
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd.
Citation
Journal of Family Therapy, 2011, v. 33 n. 3, p. 332-352 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this article an attempt is made to understand how power and control issues between genders manifest themselves in eating habits in a Chinese family context, which contribute to the child's obesity problems. Eight obese children (six boys and two girls) and their families participated in the qualitative study. Their ages range from 7 to 13. The two clinical themes of power dynamics in eating habits that emerged in the findings are the dominant husband and the wife in charge. Eating practices are characterized by struggles over who is in control and power is played out in the gendered division of work in the kitchen, food preferences or feeding practices. The powerful parent was observed to be the one allied with the obese child, and the coalition further increased the power base. The study also reveals women's power dominance in a society in which patriarchal values prevail. Implications for treatment are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208138
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.434
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.898

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, OL-
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-13T03:11:24Z-
dc.date.available2015-02-13T03:11:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Family Therapy, 2011, v. 33 n. 3, p. 332-352-
dc.identifier.issn0163-4445-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/208138-
dc.description.abstractIn this article an attempt is made to understand how power and control issues between genders manifest themselves in eating habits in a Chinese family context, which contribute to the child's obesity problems. Eight obese children (six boys and two girls) and their families participated in the qualitative study. Their ages range from 7 to 13. The two clinical themes of power dynamics in eating habits that emerged in the findings are the dominant husband and the wife in charge. Eating practices are characterized by struggles over who is in control and power is played out in the gendered division of work in the kitchen, food preferences or feeding practices. The powerful parent was observed to be the one allied with the obese child, and the coalition further increased the power base. The study also reveals women's power dominance in a society in which patriarchal values prevail. Implications for treatment are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd.-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Family Therapy-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectChinese families-
dc.subjectEating-
dc.subjectGender-
dc.subjectPower-
dc.titleGendered power in eating habits: insight into childhood obesity in a Chinese family contexten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, OL: wongol@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-6427.2011.00536.x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79959871238-
dc.identifier.hkuros172090-
dc.identifier.volume33-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage332-
dc.identifier.epage352-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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