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Article: Scribal Practice within the Earliest Scroll of Qin Treatises: Manuscript Hikone, Hikone-jō Hakubutsukan V633 Yang Yuanzheng

TitleScribal Practice within the Earliest Scroll of Qin Treatises: Manuscript Hikone, Hikone-jō Hakubutsukan V633 Yang Yuanzheng
『琴用指法』の写本学的研究
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherNippon Ongaku Gakkai. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.musicology-japan.org/english.html#Ongakugaku
Citation
Journal of Musiological Society of Japan, 2007, v. 53 n. 1, p. 69-85 How to Cite?
Ongakugaku, 2007, v. 53 n. 1, p. 69-85 How to Cite?
AbstractManuscript Hikone, Hikone-jō Hakubutsukan V633, is in many ways one of the most unusual sources of qin music. The recto of the Hikone scroll preserves a number of treatises on the fingering of qin playing, making it the oldest source of texts on qin fingering – and one contemporaneous to early qin music practice – that is preserved today; the verso in turn contains sketches of a saibara piece, Chinese verses and three groups of casual drawings. Being the only Japanese source housing exclusively Chinese or Chinese-derived practical treatises on early qin music, it is self-evident that the Hikone scroll is of paramount importance for any exploration of the transmission of ancient East Asian music. Moreover, the original scroll, while indirectly available to scholars through a number of tracing copies all along, had disappeared among the historical documents of the Ii family for several centuries, and therefore was unknown to modern scholarship until its (re-)discovery was announced by Goshima Kuniharu in 1994. As a result, our knowledge of this crucial source remains incomplete: No full-fledged codicological study of the original scroll has been offered to date; the origins of the Hikone manuscript remain shrouded in darkness; and its contents have only been insufficiently catalogued. To address these lacunae, a careful physical examination of the Hikone manuscript was carried out in November 2004 as part of my ongoing study of the source. In the present paper, using codicological analysis, I shall investigate the Hikone manuscript as a physical artifact and provide the first detailed description of its external features; an analysis of the various scripts and their owners; a reconstruction of the copying sequence; and an inventory of its contents.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207552
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-31T03:24:35Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-31T03:24:35Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Musiological Society of Japan, 2007, v. 53 n. 1, p. 69-85-
dc.identifier.citationOngakugaku, 2007, v. 53 n. 1, p. 69-85-
dc.identifier.issn0030-2597-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207552-
dc.description.abstractManuscript Hikone, Hikone-jō Hakubutsukan V633, is in many ways one of the most unusual sources of qin music. The recto of the Hikone scroll preserves a number of treatises on the fingering of qin playing, making it the oldest source of texts on qin fingering – and one contemporaneous to early qin music practice – that is preserved today; the verso in turn contains sketches of a saibara piece, Chinese verses and three groups of casual drawings. Being the only Japanese source housing exclusively Chinese or Chinese-derived practical treatises on early qin music, it is self-evident that the Hikone scroll is of paramount importance for any exploration of the transmission of ancient East Asian music. Moreover, the original scroll, while indirectly available to scholars through a number of tracing copies all along, had disappeared among the historical documents of the Ii family for several centuries, and therefore was unknown to modern scholarship until its (re-)discovery was announced by Goshima Kuniharu in 1994. As a result, our knowledge of this crucial source remains incomplete: No full-fledged codicological study of the original scroll has been offered to date; the origins of the Hikone manuscript remain shrouded in darkness; and its contents have only been insufficiently catalogued. To address these lacunae, a careful physical examination of the Hikone manuscript was carried out in November 2004 as part of my ongoing study of the source. In the present paper, using codicological analysis, I shall investigate the Hikone manuscript as a physical artifact and provide the first detailed description of its external features; an analysis of the various scripts and their owners; a reconstruction of the copying sequence; and an inventory of its contents.-
dc.languagejpn-
dc.publisherNippon Ongaku Gakkai. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.musicology-japan.org/english.html#Ongakugaku-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Musiological Society of Japan-
dc.relation.ispartofOngakugaku-
dc.titleScribal Practice within the Earliest Scroll of Qin Treatises: Manuscript Hikone, Hikone-jō Hakubutsukan V633 Yang Yuanzhengen_US
dc.title『琴用指法』の写本学的研究-
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYang, Y: yuanzhen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.hkuros166919-
dc.identifier.volume53-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage69-
dc.identifier.epage85-
dc.publisher.placeJapan-

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