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Article: Differential effects of source-specific particulate matter on emergency hospitalizations for ischemic heart disease in Hong Kong

TitleDifferential effects of source-specific particulate matter on emergency hospitalizations for ischemic heart disease in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
Environmental Health Perspectives, 2014, v. 122, n. 4, p. 391-396 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is a major public health concern. Although many epidemiologic studies have reported evidence of adverse effects of particulate matter (PM) mass on IHD, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the potential impacts of different PM sources. Much the same as PM size, PM sources may influence toxicological characteristics. Objectives: We identified contributing sources to PM10 mass and estimated the acute effects of PM10 sources on daily emergency IHD hospitalizations in Hong Kong. Methods: We analyzed the concentration data of 19 PM10 chemical components measured between 2001 and 2007 by positive matrix factorization to apportion PM10 mass, and used generalized additive models to estimate associations of interquartile range (IQR) increases in PM10 exposures with IHD hospitalization for different lag periods (up to 5 days), adjusted for potential confounders. Results: We identified 8 PM10 sources: vehicle exhaust, soil/road dust, regional combustion, residual oil, fresh sea salt, aged sea salt, secondary nitrate, and secondary sulfate. Vehicle exhaust, secondary nitrate, and secondary sulfate contributed more than half of the PM10 mass. Although associations with IQR increases in 2-day moving averages (lag01) were statistically significant for most sources based on single-source models, only PM10 from vehicle exhaust [1.87% (95% CI: 0.66, 3.10); IQR = 4.9 μg/m3], secondary nitrate [2.28% (95% CI: 1.15, 3.42); IQR = 8.6 μg/m3], and aged sea salt [1.19% (95% CI: 0.04, 2.36); IQR = 5.9 μg/m3] were significantly associated with IHD hospitalizations in the multisource model. Analysis using chemical components provided similar findings. Conclusion: Emergency IHD hospitalization was significantly linked with PM10 from vehicle exhaust, nitrate-rich secondary PM, and sea salt-related PM. Findings may help prioritize toxicological research and guide future monitoring and emission-control polices.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207089
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.443
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.529
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPun, Vivianchit-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Ignatius-
dc.contributor.authorHo, Kinfai-
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Hong-
dc.contributor.authorSun, Zhiwei-
dc.contributor.authorTian, Linwei-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T04:31:23Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-09T04:31:23Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Health Perspectives, 2014, v. 122, n. 4, p. 391-396-
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207089-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is a major public health concern. Although many epidemiologic studies have reported evidence of adverse effects of particulate matter (PM) mass on IHD, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the potential impacts of different PM sources. Much the same as PM size, PM sources may influence toxicological characteristics. Objectives: We identified contributing sources to PM10 mass and estimated the acute effects of PM10 sources on daily emergency IHD hospitalizations in Hong Kong. Methods: We analyzed the concentration data of 19 PM10 chemical components measured between 2001 and 2007 by positive matrix factorization to apportion PM10 mass, and used generalized additive models to estimate associations of interquartile range (IQR) increases in PM10 exposures with IHD hospitalization for different lag periods (up to 5 days), adjusted for potential confounders. Results: We identified 8 PM10 sources: vehicle exhaust, soil/road dust, regional combustion, residual oil, fresh sea salt, aged sea salt, secondary nitrate, and secondary sulfate. Vehicle exhaust, secondary nitrate, and secondary sulfate contributed more than half of the PM10 mass. Although associations with IQR increases in 2-day moving averages (lag01) were statistically significant for most sources based on single-source models, only PM10 from vehicle exhaust [1.87% (95% CI: 0.66, 3.10); IQR = 4.9 μg/m3], secondary nitrate [2.28% (95% CI: 1.15, 3.42); IQR = 8.6 μg/m3], and aged sea salt [1.19% (95% CI: 0.04, 2.36); IQR = 5.9 μg/m3] were significantly associated with IHD hospitalizations in the multisource model. Analysis using chemical components provided similar findings. Conclusion: Emergency IHD hospitalization was significantly linked with PM10 from vehicle exhaust, nitrate-rich secondary PM, and sea salt-related PM. Findings may help prioritize toxicological research and guide future monitoring and emission-control polices.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Health Perspectives-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleDifferential effects of source-specific particulate matter on emergency hospitalizations for ischemic heart disease in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1289/ehp.1307213-
dc.identifier.pmid24509062-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3984224-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84897379277-
dc.identifier.volume122-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage391-
dc.identifier.epage396-
dc.identifier.eissn1552-9924-

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