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Article: History of lung disease and risk of lung cancer in a population with high household fuel combustion exposures in rural China

TitleHistory of lung disease and risk of lung cancer in a population with high household fuel combustion exposures in rural China
Authors
KeywordsXuanwei
China
Chronic lung disease
Lung cancer
Never smoking
Issue Date2013
Citation
Lung Cancer, 2013, v. 81, n. 3, p. 343-346 How to Cite?
AbstractHistory of chronic lung diseases and household coal use for heating and cooking are established risk factors of lung cancer; however, few studies have been able to explore these risk factors simultaneously. Xuanwei, China, has some of the highest rates of lung cancer in China and most residents experience substantial in-home coal smoke exposures. Using a population-based case-control study of 498 lung cancer cases and 498 age-matched controls, we evaluated the risk of lung cancer in relation to coal smoke exposure and history of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, tuberculosis (TB), chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by conditional logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders. We observed an increased risk of lung cancer with history of any chronic lung disease among males (OR. = 14.2; 95%CI. = 4.3-46.9), females (OR. = 2.6; 95%CI. = 1.1-6.3), smokers (OR. = 12.7; 95%CI. = 3.5-45.8), and nonsmokers (OR. = 2.6; 95%CI. = 1.1-6.4). Specifically, TB (OR. = 83.7; 95%CI. = 11.0-634.7), COPD (OR. = 3.2; 95%CI. = 1.7-6.0), and emphysema and chronic bronchitis (OR. = 3.3; 95%CI. = 1.7-6.4) were associated with increased risks. These findings suggest that history of chronic lung diseases may also increase risk of lung cancer in populations with indoor coal smoke exposures. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207074
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.767
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.923

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHosgoodIII, H. Dean-
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Robert Sedgwick-
dc.contributor.authorHe, Xingzhou-
dc.contributor.authorHu, Wei-
dc.contributor.authorTian, Linwei-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Larry Z.-
dc.contributor.authorLai, Hong-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Wei-
dc.contributor.authorRothman, Nathaniel-
dc.contributor.authorLan, Qing-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T04:31:21Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-09T04:31:21Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationLung Cancer, 2013, v. 81, n. 3, p. 343-346-
dc.identifier.issn0169-5002-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207074-
dc.description.abstractHistory of chronic lung diseases and household coal use for heating and cooking are established risk factors of lung cancer; however, few studies have been able to explore these risk factors simultaneously. Xuanwei, China, has some of the highest rates of lung cancer in China and most residents experience substantial in-home coal smoke exposures. Using a population-based case-control study of 498 lung cancer cases and 498 age-matched controls, we evaluated the risk of lung cancer in relation to coal smoke exposure and history of chronic lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, tuberculosis (TB), chronic bronchitis, and emphysema. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by conditional logistic regression adjusting for potential confounders. We observed an increased risk of lung cancer with history of any chronic lung disease among males (OR. = 14.2; 95%CI. = 4.3-46.9), females (OR. = 2.6; 95%CI. = 1.1-6.3), smokers (OR. = 12.7; 95%CI. = 3.5-45.8), and nonsmokers (OR. = 2.6; 95%CI. = 1.1-6.4). Specifically, TB (OR. = 83.7; 95%CI. = 11.0-634.7), COPD (OR. = 3.2; 95%CI. = 1.7-6.0), and emphysema and chronic bronchitis (OR. = 3.3; 95%CI. = 1.7-6.4) were associated with increased risks. These findings suggest that history of chronic lung diseases may also increase risk of lung cancer in populations with indoor coal smoke exposures. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofLung Cancer-
dc.subjectXuanwei-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectChronic lung disease-
dc.subjectLung cancer-
dc.subjectNever smoking-
dc.titleHistory of lung disease and risk of lung cancer in a population with high household fuel combustion exposures in rural China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.lungcan.2013.06.019-
dc.identifier.pmid23891511-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84881664962-
dc.identifier.volume81-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage343-
dc.identifier.epage346-
dc.identifier.eissn1872-8332-

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