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Article: Differential effects of fine and coarse particles on daily emergency cardiovascular hospitalizations in Hong Kong

TitleDifferential effects of fine and coarse particles on daily emergency cardiovascular hospitalizations in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsFine particles
Cardiovascular diseases
Coarse particles
Differential effect
Emergency hospital admissions
Time series study
Issue Date2013
Citation
Atmospheric Environment, 2013, v. 64, p. 296-302 How to Cite?
AbstractFew studies have investigated the relationship of hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases with fine (PM2.5: particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) and coarse particles (PMc: particles with an aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm) simultaneously. We aimed to estimate the differential effects of PM2.5 and PMc on emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases, after controlling for the gaseous pollutants. We conducted a time series analysis in Hong Kong using daily emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases, PM2.5 and PMc concentrations from January 2000 to December 2005. PMc concentrations were estimated by subtracting PM2.5 from PM10 measurements. Generalized additive Poisson models allowing overdispersion and autocorrelation were used to examine the effects of PM2.5 and PMc simultaneously, adjusting for time trends, weather conditions, influenza outbreaks, and gaseous pollutants. In two-pollutant model, an interquartile range (IQR) increase in the 2-day moving average (lag01) concentration of PM2.5 and PMc corresponded to 1.86% (95% CI: 0.85%, 2.88%) and -0.16% (95% CI: -1.07%, 0.76%) change of emergency hospital admissions for total circulatory diseases respectively. Results were sensitive to further inclusion of nitrogen dioxide but not of ozone and sulfur dioxide. We did not find any effects of PMc on circulatory hospitalizations independent of PM2.5. In conclusion, we confirmed the stronger and significant adverse effects of PM2.5, but no independent effect of PMc on emergency cardiovascular hospitalizations. The biological mechanisms underlying the differential effects of PM2.5 and PMc on cardiovascular diseases were discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207065
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.459
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.999

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Hong-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Ignatius-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xiaorong-
dc.contributor.authorTian, Linwei-
dc.contributor.authorTse, Lapah-
dc.contributor.authorWong, Tzewai-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-09T04:31:20Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-09T04:31:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationAtmospheric Environment, 2013, v. 64, p. 296-302-
dc.identifier.issn1352-2310-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/207065-
dc.description.abstractFew studies have investigated the relationship of hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases with fine (PM2.5: particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) and coarse particles (PMc: particles with an aerodynamic diameter between 2.5 and 10 μm) simultaneously. We aimed to estimate the differential effects of PM2.5 and PMc on emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases, after controlling for the gaseous pollutants. We conducted a time series analysis in Hong Kong using daily emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases, PM2.5 and PMc concentrations from January 2000 to December 2005. PMc concentrations were estimated by subtracting PM2.5 from PM10 measurements. Generalized additive Poisson models allowing overdispersion and autocorrelation were used to examine the effects of PM2.5 and PMc simultaneously, adjusting for time trends, weather conditions, influenza outbreaks, and gaseous pollutants. In two-pollutant model, an interquartile range (IQR) increase in the 2-day moving average (lag01) concentration of PM2.5 and PMc corresponded to 1.86% (95% CI: 0.85%, 2.88%) and -0.16% (95% CI: -1.07%, 0.76%) change of emergency hospital admissions for total circulatory diseases respectively. Results were sensitive to further inclusion of nitrogen dioxide but not of ozone and sulfur dioxide. We did not find any effects of PMc on circulatory hospitalizations independent of PM2.5. In conclusion, we confirmed the stronger and significant adverse effects of PM2.5, but no independent effect of PMc on emergency cardiovascular hospitalizations. The biological mechanisms underlying the differential effects of PM2.5 and PMc on cardiovascular diseases were discussed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAtmospheric Environment-
dc.subjectFine particles-
dc.subjectCardiovascular diseases-
dc.subjectCoarse particles-
dc.subjectDifferential effect-
dc.subjectEmergency hospital admissions-
dc.subjectTime series study-
dc.titleDifferential effects of fine and coarse particles on daily emergency cardiovascular hospitalizations in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.atmosenv.2012.09.060-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84868225240-
dc.identifier.volume64-
dc.identifier.spage296-
dc.identifier.epage302-
dc.identifier.eissn1873-2844-

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