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postgraduate thesis: A study of an effective compression of morbidity strategy for Hong Kong

TitleA study of an effective compression of morbidity strategy for Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Sin, Y. [冼遠光]. (2014). A study of an effective compression of morbidity strategy for Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5320637
AbstractThe ageing population has been increasing the healthcare expenditure of Hong Kong and will continue to increase the financial burden. James Fries proposed a phenomenon of compression of morbidity in the early 1980s that the onset of morbidity of elderly can be delayed to a later year and the duration of disability can be compressed. If it works, it could be a solution to ease the burden caused by the ageing population. Scholars around the world have carried out research for the evaluation of the existence of the compression of morbidity and its effects. Inconsistent inter-countries and intra-country results on the effect of compression of morbidity from the studies were reviewed. It was found that compression of morbidity is not necessarily associated with longer life expectancy. Effective policies have to be implemented to work against the causes of morbidity in order to realise the benefits of compression of morbidity. It has to be an integrated policy from healthcare promotion, providing accessible physical exercise facilities, improving air quality through legislation and appropriate public health policy for people of Hong Kong.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectOlder people - Diseases - China - Hong Kong
Dept/ProgramPublic Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206986

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSin, Yuen-kwong-
dc.contributor.author冼遠光-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-04T23:17:25Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-04T23:17:25Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationSin, Y. [冼遠光]. (2014). A study of an effective compression of morbidity strategy for Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5320637-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206986-
dc.description.abstractThe ageing population has been increasing the healthcare expenditure of Hong Kong and will continue to increase the financial burden. James Fries proposed a phenomenon of compression of morbidity in the early 1980s that the onset of morbidity of elderly can be delayed to a later year and the duration of disability can be compressed. If it works, it could be a solution to ease the burden caused by the ageing population. Scholars around the world have carried out research for the evaluation of the existence of the compression of morbidity and its effects. Inconsistent inter-countries and intra-country results on the effect of compression of morbidity from the studies were reviewed. It was found that compression of morbidity is not necessarily associated with longer life expectancy. Effective policies have to be implemented to work against the causes of morbidity in order to realise the benefits of compression of morbidity. It has to be an integrated policy from healthcare promotion, providing accessible physical exercise facilities, improving air quality through legislation and appropriate public health policy for people of Hong Kong.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshOlder people - Diseases - China - Hong Kong-
dc.titleA study of an effective compression of morbidity strategy for Hong Kong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5320637-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5320637-

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