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postgraduate thesis: Factors related to patient participation congruence in decision making among women with breast cancer : a systematic review

TitleFactors related to patient participation congruence in decision making among women with breast cancer : a systematic review
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Xu, B. [許璧文]. (2014). Factors related to patient participation congruence in decision making among women with breast cancer : a systematic review. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5320745
AbstractBackground Breast cancer prevalence is increasing in most countries. Not only the threat of death and impact of breast cancer treatment, but also the participation roles during treatment decision making can be substantial, leading to psychological distress and poor quality of life. Previous studies have explored patients’ participation preference, the extent of participation congruence and related factors, revealing that women suffering from breast cancer may benefit from participation in treatment decision making whilst participation incongruity could be potentially detrimental for women with breast cancer. Objectives This study aimed to systematically review the literature and summarize the extent of breast cancer patients’ participation preference, participation congruence, and related factors. Methods Multiple searches for key words were conducted through electronic sources, including PubMed, PsycINFO, and Medline via Ovid databases for all relevant English language literature. Studies were selected basing on specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. The STROBE checklist was applied for reporting quality assessment. Results A total of 778 studies were identified. Twelve eligible studies were included in this review. Twelve factors relating to breast cancer women’s participation congruence in treatment decision making were identified as follows: age, nature of preferred role of treatment decision making, educational level, time related issues, language/ethnicity, marital status, information and recommendations of treatment, offering treatment options, physician characteristics, type of therapy or cancer program, stage of breast cancer, and surgeon volume. Conclusions Three themes (i.e. patient oriented, physician-patient interaction, and medical provision) of intervention points towards patient participation congruence were synthesized and discussed, and they were useful for improving the quality of existing breast cancer treatment decision making by addressing patient’s perceived participation congruence.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectBreast - Cancer - Treatment - Decision making
Dept/ProgramPublic Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206981

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Biwen-
dc.contributor.author許璧文-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-04T23:17:25Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-04T23:17:25Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationXu, B. [許璧文]. (2014). Factors related to patient participation congruence in decision making among women with breast cancer : a systematic review. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5320745-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206981-
dc.description.abstractBackground Breast cancer prevalence is increasing in most countries. Not only the threat of death and impact of breast cancer treatment, but also the participation roles during treatment decision making can be substantial, leading to psychological distress and poor quality of life. Previous studies have explored patients’ participation preference, the extent of participation congruence and related factors, revealing that women suffering from breast cancer may benefit from participation in treatment decision making whilst participation incongruity could be potentially detrimental for women with breast cancer. Objectives This study aimed to systematically review the literature and summarize the extent of breast cancer patients’ participation preference, participation congruence, and related factors. Methods Multiple searches for key words were conducted through electronic sources, including PubMed, PsycINFO, and Medline via Ovid databases for all relevant English language literature. Studies were selected basing on specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. The STROBE checklist was applied for reporting quality assessment. Results A total of 778 studies were identified. Twelve eligible studies were included in this review. Twelve factors relating to breast cancer women’s participation congruence in treatment decision making were identified as follows: age, nature of preferred role of treatment decision making, educational level, time related issues, language/ethnicity, marital status, information and recommendations of treatment, offering treatment options, physician characteristics, type of therapy or cancer program, stage of breast cancer, and surgeon volume. Conclusions Three themes (i.e. patient oriented, physician-patient interaction, and medical provision) of intervention points towards patient participation congruence were synthesized and discussed, and they were useful for improving the quality of existing breast cancer treatment decision making by addressing patient’s perceived participation congruence.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshBreast - Cancer - Treatment - Decision making-
dc.titleFactors related to patient participation congruence in decision making among women with breast cancer : a systematic review-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5320745-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5320745-

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