File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: The pattern of invasive pneumococcal disease in Hong Kong, other parts of China, United States and Thailand : a focus on impact of pneumococcal vaccination : a systematic review

TitleThe pattern of invasive pneumococcal disease in Hong Kong, other parts of China, United States and Thailand : a focus on impact of pneumococcal vaccination : a systematic review
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lee, L. [李勵嘉]. (2014). The pattern of invasive pneumococcal disease in Hong Kong, other parts of China, United States and Thailand : a focus on impact of pneumococcal vaccination : a systematic review. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5320437
AbstractObjectives: By summarizing and comparing the pattern of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the 4 areas (namely Hong Kong, other parts of China, United States and Thailand) at different stages of implementation of universal pneumococcal vaccination, a snapshot picture could be obtained to visualize how pneumococcal vaccination has impacted upon various important measures, including the burden of IPD, prevalent serotypes, antimicrobial resistance, risk factors of IPD, to guide us on the next step to optimize our ability to combat against IPD. Methods: To achieve the objective, a systematic search through PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, EmBase, CINAHL, and the China Journal Net (for Chinese journal articles to obtain a more comprehensive data for “other parts of mainland) has been performed. Articles were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and in straight accordance to the literature search and article retrieval steps as described in the methodology. The quality of the articles was assessed by the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) checklists. Results: In general, there was decline in IPD incidence after PCV vaccination, but the problem of serotype replacement and antimicrobial resistance was still an ongoing problem, which differs geographically. Conclusion: From the above data, we could see the significant impact on PCV on reduction of incidence in IPD as shown in United States, however, it was also very clear that unless development of non-serotype specific vaccine become available to us, we are still facing the problem of serotype replacement and that we need to have regular surveillance, as in the case of United States, to supply the data for timely replacement of new PCV combating the emerging serotypes, such that we would still be in the safe ground. In Hong Kong, the statutory reporting of IPD to Centre for Health and Protection (CHP) has been effective since 2/1/201443, after the start of universal immunization since October 2008, followed by PCV10 in 2009 and PCV13 in December 2011, we seems lacking behind on the surveillance. With the surveillance started by CHP, we hope to understand the Hong Kong situation better and with more published data for our local burden and serotype pattern of IPD. It is interesting to note that the antimicrobial pattern does vary geographically, even in US with universal immunization. This suggests that while PCV was helping us to reduce the penicillin resistant strain, another more important factor – the practice of use of antibiotics- is still operating to effect on the overall antibiotic resistance. The pattern that rural Thailand was having much much less penicillin resistance as compared to urban Bangkok, where antibiotic is more readily available, also supports this explanation.
DegreeMaster of Public Health
SubjectPneumonia, Pneumococcal
Pneumococcal vaccine
Dept/ProgramPublic Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206944

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Lai-ka-
dc.contributor.author李勵嘉-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-04T23:17:21Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-04T23:17:21Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationLee, L. [李勵嘉]. (2014). The pattern of invasive pneumococcal disease in Hong Kong, other parts of China, United States and Thailand : a focus on impact of pneumococcal vaccination : a systematic review. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5320437-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206944-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: By summarizing and comparing the pattern of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the 4 areas (namely Hong Kong, other parts of China, United States and Thailand) at different stages of implementation of universal pneumococcal vaccination, a snapshot picture could be obtained to visualize how pneumococcal vaccination has impacted upon various important measures, including the burden of IPD, prevalent serotypes, antimicrobial resistance, risk factors of IPD, to guide us on the next step to optimize our ability to combat against IPD. Methods: To achieve the objective, a systematic search through PubMed, Medline, Cochrane Library, EmBase, CINAHL, and the China Journal Net (for Chinese journal articles to obtain a more comprehensive data for “other parts of mainland) has been performed. Articles were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and in straight accordance to the literature search and article retrieval steps as described in the methodology. The quality of the articles was assessed by the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) checklists. Results: In general, there was decline in IPD incidence after PCV vaccination, but the problem of serotype replacement and antimicrobial resistance was still an ongoing problem, which differs geographically. Conclusion: From the above data, we could see the significant impact on PCV on reduction of incidence in IPD as shown in United States, however, it was also very clear that unless development of non-serotype specific vaccine become available to us, we are still facing the problem of serotype replacement and that we need to have regular surveillance, as in the case of United States, to supply the data for timely replacement of new PCV combating the emerging serotypes, such that we would still be in the safe ground. In Hong Kong, the statutory reporting of IPD to Centre for Health and Protection (CHP) has been effective since 2/1/201443, after the start of universal immunization since October 2008, followed by PCV10 in 2009 and PCV13 in December 2011, we seems lacking behind on the surveillance. With the surveillance started by CHP, we hope to understand the Hong Kong situation better and with more published data for our local burden and serotype pattern of IPD. It is interesting to note that the antimicrobial pattern does vary geographically, even in US with universal immunization. This suggests that while PCV was helping us to reduce the penicillin resistant strain, another more important factor – the practice of use of antibiotics- is still operating to effect on the overall antibiotic resistance. The pattern that rural Thailand was having much much less penicillin resistance as compared to urban Bangkok, where antibiotic is more readily available, also supports this explanation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshPneumonia, Pneumococcal-
dc.subject.lcshPneumococcal vaccine-
dc.titleThe pattern of invasive pneumococcal disease in Hong Kong, other parts of China, United States and Thailand : a focus on impact of pneumococcal vaccination : a systematic review-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5320437-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5320437-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats