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Conference Paper: Trajectory of Health and Functioning of Minority Immigrant Elders: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

TitleTrajectory of Health and Functioning of Minority Immigrant Elders: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://gerontologist.gerontologyjournals.org
Citation
The 67th Annual Scientific Meeting of The Gerontological Society of America (GSA 2014), Washington, DC., 5-9 November 2014. In the Gerontologist, 2014, v. 54 suppl. 2, p. 357, abstract no. 292 How to Cite?
AbstractUsing 1992 to 2010 longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study, this study investigated the health trajectories over the life course for non-immigrants, and immigrants who came to the United States at different age. This research analyzed the initial HRS cohort (born 1931 to 1941) in the US (N=8,803). Birth place was examined (foreign born=864). The outcome variables included biennial measure of whether they were still alive or not, self-reported health, number of ADL/ IADL difficulties, depression (CES-D), and number of diagnosed diseases. We fit Cox proportional hazards models to identify the risk factors of mortality. Latent Growth Curve (LGC) modeling is performed to estimate changes of different health outcomes across the 18-year period. The results indicated that immigrants are 39% less likely to die than their non-immigrant counterparts. Further, estimates from LGC analysis showed that immigrant elders reported significantly worse health conditions and ADL, with a faster rate of deterioration. Immigrants also reported a higher level of depression. However, the decline rate of mental health was slower among immigrants than non-immigrants. When comparing across the immigrant groups, elders who moved to the United States at the older age (50 or older) had a hazard ratio of 28% comparing with the younger age (below 18) group. Findings point to the importance of considering all these correlates in improving the overall quality of care for minority immigrants to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities among older population in the US.
DescriptionConference Theme: Making Connections: From Cells to Societies
Poster Presentation: Community Care and Vulnerable Adults
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206894
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.168
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.584

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLum, TYSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, GHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-02T11:47:45Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-02T11:47:45Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 67th Annual Scientific Meeting of The Gerontological Society of America (GSA 2014), Washington, DC., 5-9 November 2014. In the Gerontologist, 2014, v. 54 suppl. 2, p. 357, abstract no. 292en_US
dc.identifier.issn0016-9013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206894-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Making Connections: From Cells to Societies-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation: Community Care and Vulnerable Adults-
dc.description.abstractUsing 1992 to 2010 longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study, this study investigated the health trajectories over the life course for non-immigrants, and immigrants who came to the United States at different age. This research analyzed the initial HRS cohort (born 1931 to 1941) in the US (N=8,803). Birth place was examined (foreign born=864). The outcome variables included biennial measure of whether they were still alive or not, self-reported health, number of ADL/ IADL difficulties, depression (CES-D), and number of diagnosed diseases. We fit Cox proportional hazards models to identify the risk factors of mortality. Latent Growth Curve (LGC) modeling is performed to estimate changes of different health outcomes across the 18-year period. The results indicated that immigrants are 39% less likely to die than their non-immigrant counterparts. Further, estimates from LGC analysis showed that immigrant elders reported significantly worse health conditions and ADL, with a faster rate of deterioration. Immigrants also reported a higher level of depression. However, the decline rate of mental health was slower among immigrants than non-immigrants. When comparing across the immigrant groups, elders who moved to the United States at the older age (50 or older) had a hazard ratio of 28% comparing with the younger age (below 18) group. Findings point to the importance of considering all these correlates in improving the overall quality of care for minority immigrants to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities among older population in the US.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://gerontologist.gerontologyjournals.org-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Gerontologisten_US
dc.titleTrajectory of Health and Functioning of Minority Immigrant Elders: A Latent Growth Curve Analysisen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLuo, H: haoluo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLum, TYS: tlum@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, GHY: ghywong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJiang, N: nanj@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLum, TYS=rp01513en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, GHY=rp01850en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/geront/gnu106-
dc.identifier.hkuros241532en_US
dc.identifier.volume54-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 2-
dc.identifier.spage357, abstract no. 292-
dc.identifier.epage357, abstract no. 292-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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