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Article: Association between antibody titers and protection against influenza virus infection within households

TitleAssociation between antibody titers and protection against influenza virus infection within households
Authors
KeywordsAntibody
Influenza
Family Health
Transmission
Immunity
Issue Date2014
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/jid/
Citation
Journal of Infectious Diseases , 2014, v. 210 n. 5, p. 684-692 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Previous studies have established that antibody titer measured by the hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) assay is correlated with protection against influenza virus infection, with an HAI titer of 1:40 generally associated with 50% protection. METHODS: We recruited index cases with confirmed influenza virus infection from outpatient clinics, and followed up their household contacts for 7-10 days to identify secondary infections. Serum samples collected from a subset of household contacts were tested by HAI and microneutralization (MN) assays against prevalent influenza viruses. We analyzed the data using an individual hazard-based transmission model that adjusted for age and vaccination history. RESULTS: Compared to a reference group with antibody titers <1:10, we found that HAI titers of 1:40 against influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) were associated with 31% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13%-46%) and 31% (CI, 1%-53%) protection against polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) virus infection, respectively, while an MN titer of 1:40 against A(H3N2) was associated with 49% (95% CI, 7%-81%) protection against PCR-confirmed A(H3N2) virus infection. CONCLUSIONS: An HAI titer of 1:40 was associated with substantially less than 50% protection against PCR-confirmed influenza virus infection within households, perhaps because of exposures of greater duration or intensity in that confined setting.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206886
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 5.186
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.000
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, TK-
dc.contributor.authorCauchemez, S-
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPM-
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, G-
dc.contributor.authorFang, VJ-
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKM-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ-
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-02T11:14:19Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-02T11:14:19Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Infectious Diseases , 2014, v. 210 n. 5, p. 684-692-
dc.identifier.issn0022-1899-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206886-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Previous studies have established that antibody titer measured by the hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) assay is correlated with protection against influenza virus infection, with an HAI titer of 1:40 generally associated with 50% protection. METHODS: We recruited index cases with confirmed influenza virus infection from outpatient clinics, and followed up their household contacts for 7-10 days to identify secondary infections. Serum samples collected from a subset of household contacts were tested by HAI and microneutralization (MN) assays against prevalent influenza viruses. We analyzed the data using an individual hazard-based transmission model that adjusted for age and vaccination history. RESULTS: Compared to a reference group with antibody titers <1:10, we found that HAI titers of 1:40 against influenza A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) were associated with 31% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13%-46%) and 31% (CI, 1%-53%) protection against polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) virus infection, respectively, while an MN titer of 1:40 against A(H3N2) was associated with 49% (95% CI, 7%-81%) protection against PCR-confirmed A(H3N2) virus infection. CONCLUSIONS: An HAI titer of 1:40 was associated with substantially less than 50% protection against PCR-confirmed influenza virus infection within households, perhaps because of exposures of greater duration or intensity in that confined setting.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/jid/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Infectious Diseases-
dc.subjectAntibody-
dc.subjectInfluenza-
dc.subjectFamily Health-
dc.subjectTransmission-
dc.subjectImmunity-
dc.titleAssociation between antibody titers and protection against influenza virus infection within households-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailPerera, RAPM: mahenperera@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFreeman, G: gfreeman@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFang, VJ: vickyf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityPerera, RAPM=rp02500-
dc.identifier.authorityFreeman, G=rp01694-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, DKM=rp00256-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiu186-
dc.identifier.pmid24676208-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4148604-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84907423861-
dc.identifier.hkuros241509-
dc.identifier.hkuros296996-
dc.identifier.volume210-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage684-
dc.identifier.epage692-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000344607800003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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