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postgraduate thesis: Using EEG methodology to examine the effect of exercise induced fatigue on the direction of attention during motor skill performance

TitleUsing EEG methodology to examine the effect of exercise induced fatigue on the direction of attention during motor skill performance
Authors
Advisors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lee, K. [李岡洙]. (2014). Using EEG methodology to examine the effect of exercise induced fatigue on the direction of attention during motor skill performance. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5328064
AbstractExercise induced fatigue can have a negative impact on motor skill performance. While part of the decline is attributable to physiological factors that directly influence the coordination of movement, psychological factors may also contribute. Typically, motor learning environments encourage the accumulation of task-relevant declarative knowledge, which can be depended on to consciously support performance. The literature suggests that skills learnt in this way are vulnerable to demanding performance environments, including those in which the performer is fatigued. Recent empirical work has demonstrated that ‘implicit’ motor learning environments, devised to limit declarative knowledge buildup and/or dependence on working memory, promote resilient skill performance even after exhaustive fatigue protocols. Such findings imply that dependence on declarative knowledge to support motor skill execution may be a limiting factor under physiologically fatigue. However, it remains unclear the effect fatigue has on attentional resources, such as working memory. Using established experimental paradigms and EEG methodology, a research project was designed to investigate. Two explanations were considered: (1) fatigue distracts attention away from the control of movement or (2) fatigue directs attention to the skill, which interferes with automated control of the movement. In this study novice participants were allowed to freely accumulate declarative knowledge before completing a targeted muscle-fatigue protocol. A probe response paradigm assessed participants’ ability to recall the position of movement at the time a tone sounded, under the assumption that better recall reflects skill-focused attention. Neural activity was monitored by wireless EEG technology. Neural co-activation (or coherence) between brain regions associated with motor planning (Fz or F3) and with verbal-analytical processing (T3) has been suggested to reflect conscious control of motor skills. Therefore, a fatigue induced increase in T3-F3 coherence can be interpreted as increased conscious involvement in movement control, whereas, a decrease suggests a shift of attention away from movement control. The data collected suggests that to some extent fatigue raises visual-spatial and verbal-analytical contributions to motor control, but highlights methodological issues and limitations of the work.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectMotor ability
Exercise - Physiological aspects
Fatigue
Dept/ProgramHuman Performance
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206744

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorPoolton, JM-
dc.contributor.advisorMasters, RSW-
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kangsoo-
dc.contributor.author李岡洙-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-29T23:16:34Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-29T23:16:34Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationLee, K. [李岡洙]. (2014). Using EEG methodology to examine the effect of exercise induced fatigue on the direction of attention during motor skill performance. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5328064-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206744-
dc.description.abstractExercise induced fatigue can have a negative impact on motor skill performance. While part of the decline is attributable to physiological factors that directly influence the coordination of movement, psychological factors may also contribute. Typically, motor learning environments encourage the accumulation of task-relevant declarative knowledge, which can be depended on to consciously support performance. The literature suggests that skills learnt in this way are vulnerable to demanding performance environments, including those in which the performer is fatigued. Recent empirical work has demonstrated that ‘implicit’ motor learning environments, devised to limit declarative knowledge buildup and/or dependence on working memory, promote resilient skill performance even after exhaustive fatigue protocols. Such findings imply that dependence on declarative knowledge to support motor skill execution may be a limiting factor under physiologically fatigue. However, it remains unclear the effect fatigue has on attentional resources, such as working memory. Using established experimental paradigms and EEG methodology, a research project was designed to investigate. Two explanations were considered: (1) fatigue distracts attention away from the control of movement or (2) fatigue directs attention to the skill, which interferes with automated control of the movement. In this study novice participants were allowed to freely accumulate declarative knowledge before completing a targeted muscle-fatigue protocol. A probe response paradigm assessed participants’ ability to recall the position of movement at the time a tone sounded, under the assumption that better recall reflects skill-focused attention. Neural activity was monitored by wireless EEG technology. Neural co-activation (or coherence) between brain regions associated with motor planning (Fz or F3) and with verbal-analytical processing (T3) has been suggested to reflect conscious control of motor skills. Therefore, a fatigue induced increase in T3-F3 coherence can be interpreted as increased conscious involvement in movement control, whereas, a decrease suggests a shift of attention away from movement control. The data collected suggests that to some extent fatigue raises visual-spatial and verbal-analytical contributions to motor control, but highlights methodological issues and limitations of the work.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshMotor ability-
dc.subject.lcshExercise - Physiological aspects-
dc.subject.lcshFatigue-
dc.titleUsing EEG methodology to examine the effect of exercise induced fatigue on the direction of attention during motor skill performance-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5328064-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineHuman Performance-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5328064-

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