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postgraduate thesis: Neuroprotective effects of lycium barbarum extracts in cerebral and retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury

TitleNeuroprotective effects of lycium barbarum extracts in cerebral and retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Yang, D. [楊荻]. (2014). Neuroprotective effects of lycium barbarum extracts in cerebral and retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5328058
AbstractIschemic stroke is a devastating cerebrovascular disease resulting in high mortality rate and distressing sequelae such as hemiplegia, ataxia and even visual impairment. Retinal ischemia refers to a common pathological feature shared by many blinding diseases including retinal vascular occlusions, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and retinopathy of prematurity. Ischemia/reperfusion injury is implicated in both of these pathological conditions, which greatly impact on one’s daily life. The eventual consequence of the insult is irreversible neuronal cell death and functional deterioration. Apart from current symptomatic treatment for these diseases, researchers and clinicians are dedicated to look for ideal neuroprotectant to meet the clinical needs. Traditional Chinese medicine has been received accumulating attention in recent years, and Lycium barbarum is one of them. The polysaccharides (LBP) utilized in the present study are the rich extracts of the fruit of Lycium barbarum that has been shown to exert many biological effects. This study aims to evaluate its protective effects in cerebral and retinal ischemia, which has not yet been fully investigated. A well-established rodent model, middle cerebral artery occlusion, was utilized in the present study to mimic cerebral and retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury. In the study of cerebral ischemia, both pre-treatment and post-treatment of LBP were explored. Seven-day LBP pre-treatment revealed significant protection against neurological deficits and cerebral infarction. Besides, it attenuated cerebral edema and glial activation, as well as preserved blood-brain barrier integrity. Further study showed that these beneficial effects of LBP pre-treatment might act via anti-apoptosis, antioxidation and anti-inflammation. However, similar findings were not noted in LBP post-treatment experiments, possibly due to the timing of intervention. In the investigation of retinal ischemia, the observation time was prolonged to 7 days after the insult. Electroretinogram was used to evaluate the functional alternation of retinal neurons. Sustained retinal dysfunction was induced by two-hour ischemia. LBP pre-treatment with continuous daily supplementation effectively alleviated visual dysfunction and protected the retina from morphological impairment including neuronal death, glial activation and blood-retinal barrier disruption. Similarly, these protective effects might be associated with the involvement of attenuation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. In conclusion, LBP pre-treatment with continuous daily supplementation protected the brain and retina, both functionally and morphologically, from ischemia/reperfusion injury. This dosing regimen hold great promise in serving as a prophylactic neuroprotectant in patients at high risk for ischemic stroke, as well as preserving normal visual function and reducing irreversible neuronal death in ischemic retinopathies. Further studies on the active ingredients and underlying mechanisms would be informative for better application of LBP in clinical situation.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectLycium chinense - Therapeutic use
Cerebral ischemia - Treatment
Retina - Diseases - Treatment
Neuroprotective agents
Dept/ProgramOphthalmology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206738

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Di-
dc.contributor.author楊荻-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-29T23:16:34Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-29T23:16:34Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationYang, D. [楊荻]. (2014). Neuroprotective effects of lycium barbarum extracts in cerebral and retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5328058-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206738-
dc.description.abstractIschemic stroke is a devastating cerebrovascular disease resulting in high mortality rate and distressing sequelae such as hemiplegia, ataxia and even visual impairment. Retinal ischemia refers to a common pathological feature shared by many blinding diseases including retinal vascular occlusions, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and retinopathy of prematurity. Ischemia/reperfusion injury is implicated in both of these pathological conditions, which greatly impact on one’s daily life. The eventual consequence of the insult is irreversible neuronal cell death and functional deterioration. Apart from current symptomatic treatment for these diseases, researchers and clinicians are dedicated to look for ideal neuroprotectant to meet the clinical needs. Traditional Chinese medicine has been received accumulating attention in recent years, and Lycium barbarum is one of them. The polysaccharides (LBP) utilized in the present study are the rich extracts of the fruit of Lycium barbarum that has been shown to exert many biological effects. This study aims to evaluate its protective effects in cerebral and retinal ischemia, which has not yet been fully investigated. A well-established rodent model, middle cerebral artery occlusion, was utilized in the present study to mimic cerebral and retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury. In the study of cerebral ischemia, both pre-treatment and post-treatment of LBP were explored. Seven-day LBP pre-treatment revealed significant protection against neurological deficits and cerebral infarction. Besides, it attenuated cerebral edema and glial activation, as well as preserved blood-brain barrier integrity. Further study showed that these beneficial effects of LBP pre-treatment might act via anti-apoptosis, antioxidation and anti-inflammation. However, similar findings were not noted in LBP post-treatment experiments, possibly due to the timing of intervention. In the investigation of retinal ischemia, the observation time was prolonged to 7 days after the insult. Electroretinogram was used to evaluate the functional alternation of retinal neurons. Sustained retinal dysfunction was induced by two-hour ischemia. LBP pre-treatment with continuous daily supplementation effectively alleviated visual dysfunction and protected the retina from morphological impairment including neuronal death, glial activation and blood-retinal barrier disruption. Similarly, these protective effects might be associated with the involvement of attenuation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. In conclusion, LBP pre-treatment with continuous daily supplementation protected the brain and retina, both functionally and morphologically, from ischemia/reperfusion injury. This dosing regimen hold great promise in serving as a prophylactic neuroprotectant in patients at high risk for ischemic stroke, as well as preserving normal visual function and reducing irreversible neuronal death in ischemic retinopathies. Further studies on the active ingredients and underlying mechanisms would be informative for better application of LBP in clinical situation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshLycium chinense - Therapeutic use-
dc.subject.lcshCerebral ischemia - Treatment-
dc.subject.lcshRetina - Diseases - Treatment-
dc.subject.lcshNeuroprotective agents-
dc.titleNeuroprotective effects of lycium barbarum extracts in cerebral and retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5328058-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineOphthalmology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5328058-

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