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postgraduate thesis: Making the unthinkable thinkable via first-order languaging dynamics from the perspective of ecosocial semiotic theory : a distributed language view of the pedagogic recontextualization of literary texts in L2 tertiary settings

TitleMaking the unthinkable thinkable via first-order languaging dynamics from the perspective of ecosocial semiotic theory : a distributed language view of the pedagogic recontextualization of literary texts in L2 tertiary settings
Authors
Advisors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Shi, D. [史丹]. (2014). Making the unthinkable thinkable via first-order languaging dynamics from the perspective of ecosocial semiotic theory : a distributed language view of the pedagogic recontextualization of literary texts in L2 tertiary settings. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5328048
AbstractThis study investigates what classroom participants do with literary texts and how literary texts are pedagogically recontextualized through classroom activities in L2 tertiary literature classrooms. Premised upon the pedagogic processes of decontextualization and recontextualization that take place in the meaning-making practices of the literature classroom, the current study examines the process of literary text recontextualization via the multimodal partnership of vocalization and gesticulation. Through this process, esoteric literary meanings requiring specialist knowledge are transformed into mundane meanings from one semiotic-institutional domain to another, where the literary text qua cultural artifact is recontextualized via first-order languaging by dint of pedagogic activities. To understand the real-time first-order languaging dynamics (Thibault, 2011a) that enable the pedagogic recontextualization of literary texts to take place, a micro analytical toolkit grounded in qualitative multimodal interaction analysis is used. This toolkit draws upon the concept of the Growth Point (McNeill & Duncan, 2000) in conjunction with Systemic Functional Grammar (Halliday & Matthiessen, 2004) and McNeill‘s (1992) theory of language and gesture. Classroom observation and video recording in university literature classrooms in Hong Kong and Taiwan provide multimodal data on students‘ languaging behaviours when they engage with literary texts in classroom talk. In order to make links with second-order socio-cultural norms that regulate first-order classroom interactivity (Thibault, 2011a), Bernstein‘s (1990) sociological theory of recontextualization in education is re-thought from the distributed language view (Cowley, 2011; Steffensen, 2011; Thibault, 2011a). Maton‘s (2007) Legitimation Codes of Specialization and Hunter‘s (1988) Foucaultian analysis of literature education (Foucault, 1972, 1985/1984) also inform the conceptual framework. The findings indicate the stability of the textual and lexicogrammatical constructions that function as second-order constraints and the variations in gesture use in its embodied coordination with speech in the pedagogic process of literary text recontextualization through different pedagogic activities. The semantic cohesive relations of Elaboration, Extension, Enhancement, Engagement, and Equipment, fostered by different gesture types together with their corresponding linguistic constructs in the recontextualized texts, demonstrate that the semiotic integration of speech and gesture comprise a single languaging system in the meaning-making process. Based on the production of literary meaning in moral judgement, the specialized consciousness of the ethical self is raised, with ethical subjects constituted through processes of subjectivity, self-reflexivity, and self-confession in the process of literary interpretation and appreciation. The conceptual framework integrating macro- and micro-levels of analysis manifests its theoretical originality by establishing both the methodological framework for multimodal interaction analysis and the cognitive framework for languaging dynamics. The understanding of the meaning-making process in the first-order languaging dynamics suggests that language is an embodied multimodal process. This major conclusion stimulates a re-thinking of important aspects of classroom interaction that have received little attention. Hopefully, the analysis and findings in the current study illustrate the significance of English literature education and suggest new directions for multimodal research in classroom interaction studies.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectEnglish literature - Study and teaching (Higher)
Dept/ProgramEducation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206734

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorThibault, PJ-
dc.contributor.advisorTollefson, JW-
dc.contributor.authorShi, Dan-
dc.contributor.author史丹-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-29T23:16:34Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-29T23:16:34Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationShi, D. [史丹]. (2014). Making the unthinkable thinkable via first-order languaging dynamics from the perspective of ecosocial semiotic theory : a distributed language view of the pedagogic recontextualization of literary texts in L2 tertiary settings. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5328048-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206734-
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates what classroom participants do with literary texts and how literary texts are pedagogically recontextualized through classroom activities in L2 tertiary literature classrooms. Premised upon the pedagogic processes of decontextualization and recontextualization that take place in the meaning-making practices of the literature classroom, the current study examines the process of literary text recontextualization via the multimodal partnership of vocalization and gesticulation. Through this process, esoteric literary meanings requiring specialist knowledge are transformed into mundane meanings from one semiotic-institutional domain to another, where the literary text qua cultural artifact is recontextualized via first-order languaging by dint of pedagogic activities. To understand the real-time first-order languaging dynamics (Thibault, 2011a) that enable the pedagogic recontextualization of literary texts to take place, a micro analytical toolkit grounded in qualitative multimodal interaction analysis is used. This toolkit draws upon the concept of the Growth Point (McNeill & Duncan, 2000) in conjunction with Systemic Functional Grammar (Halliday & Matthiessen, 2004) and McNeill‘s (1992) theory of language and gesture. Classroom observation and video recording in university literature classrooms in Hong Kong and Taiwan provide multimodal data on students‘ languaging behaviours when they engage with literary texts in classroom talk. In order to make links with second-order socio-cultural norms that regulate first-order classroom interactivity (Thibault, 2011a), Bernstein‘s (1990) sociological theory of recontextualization in education is re-thought from the distributed language view (Cowley, 2011; Steffensen, 2011; Thibault, 2011a). Maton‘s (2007) Legitimation Codes of Specialization and Hunter‘s (1988) Foucaultian analysis of literature education (Foucault, 1972, 1985/1984) also inform the conceptual framework. The findings indicate the stability of the textual and lexicogrammatical constructions that function as second-order constraints and the variations in gesture use in its embodied coordination with speech in the pedagogic process of literary text recontextualization through different pedagogic activities. The semantic cohesive relations of Elaboration, Extension, Enhancement, Engagement, and Equipment, fostered by different gesture types together with their corresponding linguistic constructs in the recontextualized texts, demonstrate that the semiotic integration of speech and gesture comprise a single languaging system in the meaning-making process. Based on the production of literary meaning in moral judgement, the specialized consciousness of the ethical self is raised, with ethical subjects constituted through processes of subjectivity, self-reflexivity, and self-confession in the process of literary interpretation and appreciation. The conceptual framework integrating macro- and micro-levels of analysis manifests its theoretical originality by establishing both the methodological framework for multimodal interaction analysis and the cognitive framework for languaging dynamics. The understanding of the meaning-making process in the first-order languaging dynamics suggests that language is an embodied multimodal process. This major conclusion stimulates a re-thinking of important aspects of classroom interaction that have received little attention. Hopefully, the analysis and findings in the current study illustrate the significance of English literature education and suggest new directions for multimodal research in classroom interaction studies.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshEnglish literature - Study and teaching (Higher)-
dc.titleMaking the unthinkable thinkable via first-order languaging dynamics from the perspective of ecosocial semiotic theory : a distributed language view of the pedagogic recontextualization of literary texts in L2 tertiary settings-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5328048-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineEducation-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5328048-

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