File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Tonal and segmental perception in native Cantonese-speaking musicians, amateur musicians and non-musicians

TitleTonal and segmental perception in native Cantonese-speaking musicians, amateur musicians and non-musicians
Authors
Advisors
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Pang, M. [彭明慧]. (2013). Tonal and segmental perception in native Cantonese-speaking musicians, amateur musicians and non-musicians. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5270560
AbstractTone matching, judgment and segmental judgment tasks conducted in silent reading and listening conditions are devised to test the hypothesis that musical training improves tone and segmental (onset, rime) perception in a tone language, Cantonese, in native Cantonese-speaking individuals. Four-word sequences (in which two words are primes and two are targets, or three words are primes and one is target) were presented to three groups of participants: professional musicians, amateur musicians and non-musicians in the silent reading condition, whereas four sound stimuli of Chinese characters were presented in the listening condition, and their accuracy and response time were recorded. Musicians, both professional and amateur, performed significantly better in tone and segmental perception than their musically naïve counterparts. Moreover, the response time exhibited a contrastive pattern in the two conditions: musicians tended to respond faster in the silent reading condition, but took a longer time in the listening condition. These results clearly demonstrate that musical training facilitated the perceptual processing of Cantonese tone and segmental phonemes by native Cantonese- speakers. Music-to-language transfer effects are highlighted and the non-significant differences exhibited between professional musicians and amateur musicians in five out of six tasks show that musical training need not be pursued to an advanced level for participants to gain perceptual benefits. The results shed light on possible forms of remedial programme development and interventions for children with language disorders such as dyslexia.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectSpeech perception
Cantonese dialects - Tone
Dept/ProgramLinguistics
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206684

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorTan, L-
dc.contributor.advisorMatthews, SJ-
dc.contributor.authorPang, Ming-wai-
dc.contributor.author彭明慧-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-25T03:53:17Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-25T03:53:17Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPang, M. [彭明慧]. (2013). Tonal and segmental perception in native Cantonese-speaking musicians, amateur musicians and non-musicians. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5270560-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206684-
dc.description.abstractTone matching, judgment and segmental judgment tasks conducted in silent reading and listening conditions are devised to test the hypothesis that musical training improves tone and segmental (onset, rime) perception in a tone language, Cantonese, in native Cantonese-speaking individuals. Four-word sequences (in which two words are primes and two are targets, or three words are primes and one is target) were presented to three groups of participants: professional musicians, amateur musicians and non-musicians in the silent reading condition, whereas four sound stimuli of Chinese characters were presented in the listening condition, and their accuracy and response time were recorded. Musicians, both professional and amateur, performed significantly better in tone and segmental perception than their musically naïve counterparts. Moreover, the response time exhibited a contrastive pattern in the two conditions: musicians tended to respond faster in the silent reading condition, but took a longer time in the listening condition. These results clearly demonstrate that musical training facilitated the perceptual processing of Cantonese tone and segmental phonemes by native Cantonese- speakers. Music-to-language transfer effects are highlighted and the non-significant differences exhibited between professional musicians and amateur musicians in five out of six tasks show that musical training need not be pursued to an advanced level for participants to gain perceptual benefits. The results shed light on possible forms of remedial programme development and interventions for children with language disorders such as dyslexia.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshSpeech perception-
dc.subject.lcshCantonese dialects - Tone-
dc.titleTonal and segmental perception in native Cantonese-speaking musicians, amateur musicians and non-musicians-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5270560-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineLinguistics-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5270560-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats