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postgraduate thesis: Media professionals' perspective of psychosis

TitleMedia professionals' perspective of psychosis
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Cheong, P. [張寶文]. (2014). Media professionals' perspective of psychosis. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5319072
AbstractBackground / Objectives: Mental diseases are perceived as one of the highest stigmatised conditions in our society. Public knowledge of mental illness does not come from professional journals or medical authorities, but largely from mass media as it is a major and most convenient source of information. Media tends to portray mental illness with negative attitude, focusing on bizarre and unexplainable behaviours of patients with mental illness, and exaggerating the linkage between mental illness and aggressive behaviours. However, few studies have been conducted in Hong Kong focusing on media perspective on this. This study focuses on the research of media’s role on psychosis from the perspective and experience of media professionals, and to identify media’s functional role of whether it is fostering public awareness and reducing stereotypes towards psychosis or on the contrary intensifying stigma conditions in the community of Hong Kong. Methodology: This is a qualitative study that purposive sampling method was used to recruit 22 media professionals from various media background including news media, entertainment and creative media, as well as public service broadcasting. All participants had up to one hour’s face-to-face in-depth interview based on pre-set theme of area of discussion. Results: Majority of subjects is able to recognise psychosis symptoms such as hallucination and (mainly persecutory) delusions, but unknown factors and myths about psychosis are still existed among the subjects. Confusion between psychosis, multiple personality disorders and even psychopath is commonly observed. Suggesting that media portrayal on psychosis and other mental illnesses is instilled with negative and stigmatised attitude is not prevalent. Most subjects believe that local news media can still perform with a neutral attitude when reporting the issues related to psychosis and mental illness. However, insufficient exposure of discussion about the topic across media platforms may affect public accessibility on the knowledge of psychosis and mental illness. Anti-stigma programs can contribute mostly positive messages and images about psychosis, but quality and quantity of those programs and promotions have to be designed and planned in delicate and persistent manners so as to maximise the effectiveness. Conclusion: Media plays a constructive role in educating the public about mental illness, and can also perpetuate stereotype and undermine the efforts of public campaigns. Suggesting that media practitioners are recommended to learn more about the well-round knowledge of psychosis and mental illness issue. Indeed, increased communication between media and mental health agencies can benefit the mutual understanding and lead to cooperative approach to tackle social stigma against psychosis. Though media professionals agree that media has its own limitation in terms of highly competitive broadcasting time and editorial space, most suggested that envisioned educational plan is an essential and influential method in removing public stigma and stereotype about psychosis.
DegreeMaster of Psychological Medicine
SubjectHealth in mass media
Psychoses
Mass media in mental health education
Dept/ProgramPsychological Medicine
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206554

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheong, Po-man-
dc.contributor.author張寶文-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-19T23:15:28Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-19T23:15:28Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationCheong, P. [張寶文]. (2014). Media professionals' perspective of psychosis. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5319072-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206554-
dc.description.abstractBackground / Objectives: Mental diseases are perceived as one of the highest stigmatised conditions in our society. Public knowledge of mental illness does not come from professional journals or medical authorities, but largely from mass media as it is a major and most convenient source of information. Media tends to portray mental illness with negative attitude, focusing on bizarre and unexplainable behaviours of patients with mental illness, and exaggerating the linkage between mental illness and aggressive behaviours. However, few studies have been conducted in Hong Kong focusing on media perspective on this. This study focuses on the research of media’s role on psychosis from the perspective and experience of media professionals, and to identify media’s functional role of whether it is fostering public awareness and reducing stereotypes towards psychosis or on the contrary intensifying stigma conditions in the community of Hong Kong. Methodology: This is a qualitative study that purposive sampling method was used to recruit 22 media professionals from various media background including news media, entertainment and creative media, as well as public service broadcasting. All participants had up to one hour’s face-to-face in-depth interview based on pre-set theme of area of discussion. Results: Majority of subjects is able to recognise psychosis symptoms such as hallucination and (mainly persecutory) delusions, but unknown factors and myths about psychosis are still existed among the subjects. Confusion between psychosis, multiple personality disorders and even psychopath is commonly observed. Suggesting that media portrayal on psychosis and other mental illnesses is instilled with negative and stigmatised attitude is not prevalent. Most subjects believe that local news media can still perform with a neutral attitude when reporting the issues related to psychosis and mental illness. However, insufficient exposure of discussion about the topic across media platforms may affect public accessibility on the knowledge of psychosis and mental illness. Anti-stigma programs can contribute mostly positive messages and images about psychosis, but quality and quantity of those programs and promotions have to be designed and planned in delicate and persistent manners so as to maximise the effectiveness. Conclusion: Media plays a constructive role in educating the public about mental illness, and can also perpetuate stereotype and undermine the efforts of public campaigns. Suggesting that media practitioners are recommended to learn more about the well-round knowledge of psychosis and mental illness issue. Indeed, increased communication between media and mental health agencies can benefit the mutual understanding and lead to cooperative approach to tackle social stigma against psychosis. Though media professionals agree that media has its own limitation in terms of highly competitive broadcasting time and editorial space, most suggested that envisioned educational plan is an essential and influential method in removing public stigma and stereotype about psychosis.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.lcshHealth in mass media-
dc.subject.lcshPsychoses-
dc.subject.lcshMass media in mental health education-
dc.titleMedia professionals' perspective of psychosis-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5319072-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Psychological Medicine-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePsychological Medicine-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5319072-

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