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postgraduate thesis: miR-34a : a key regulator of adipogenesis

TitlemiR-34a : a key regulator of adipogenesis
Authors
Issue Date2014
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Stillitano, A.. (2014). miR-34a : a key regulator of adipogenesis. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5319019
AbstractIntroduction Globesity, the worldwide obesity epidemic, represents a major threat and public health burden. An uncontrolled expansion of the adipose tissue followed by a chronic low-grade inflammation leads to the dysfunction of the adipose organ resulting in obesity and its associated metabolic complications. Uncovering the mechanisms of adipogenesis, the development of adipocytes, therefore strikes as a key strategy in combating the disease. MicroRNAs (miRs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, have emerged in recent years as crucial modulators of diverse biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and signal transduction emphasizing their large potential as targets. Numerous miRs have been associated with the adipose tissue and metabolism and their dysregulation has repeatedly been linked to diseases including diabetes and obesity. This study aimed to investigate the role of miR-34a, an obesity-related miR, in the regulation of pre-adipocyte differentiation. Materials and Methods Mouse 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were employed as an in vitro system to study adipogenesis. Oil Red O staining served to evaluate the degree of adipogenesis and the over-expression of miR-34a in adipocytes was achieved by a lentiviral system. MiR and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were analysed using TaqMan and SYBR Green-based quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) respectively. Results The expression of miR-34a was substantially down-regulated upon treatment of differentiation medium for two days and remained significantly low during the differentiation period compared with undifferentiated pre-adipocytes. Lentivirus-mediated over-expression of miR-34a successfully up-regulated miR-34a. Higher levels of miR-34a in turn mitigated adipogenesis as evidenced by blunted Oil Red O staining. This observation was found to be in good agreement with the qPCR analysis, which showed a down-regulation of several key adipogenic markers. Conclusion The down-regulation of miR-34a is required during pre-adipocyte differentiation for the efficient proceedings of the adipogenic programme. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the potential therapeutic implication of miR-34a-based treatment in managing obesity.
DegreeMaster of Medical Sciences
SubjectFat cells
Cell differentiation
Small interfering RNA
Dept/ProgramMedicine
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206552

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStillitano, Alexia-
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-19T23:15:28Z-
dc.date.available2014-11-19T23:15:28Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationStillitano, A.. (2014). miR-34a : a key regulator of adipogenesis. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5319019-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206552-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Globesity, the worldwide obesity epidemic, represents a major threat and public health burden. An uncontrolled expansion of the adipose tissue followed by a chronic low-grade inflammation leads to the dysfunction of the adipose organ resulting in obesity and its associated metabolic complications. Uncovering the mechanisms of adipogenesis, the development of adipocytes, therefore strikes as a key strategy in combating the disease. MicroRNAs (miRs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, have emerged in recent years as crucial modulators of diverse biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and signal transduction emphasizing their large potential as targets. Numerous miRs have been associated with the adipose tissue and metabolism and their dysregulation has repeatedly been linked to diseases including diabetes and obesity. This study aimed to investigate the role of miR-34a, an obesity-related miR, in the regulation of pre-adipocyte differentiation. Materials and Methods Mouse 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were employed as an in vitro system to study adipogenesis. Oil Red O staining served to evaluate the degree of adipogenesis and the over-expression of miR-34a in adipocytes was achieved by a lentiviral system. MiR and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were analysed using TaqMan and SYBR Green-based quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) respectively. Results The expression of miR-34a was substantially down-regulated upon treatment of differentiation medium for two days and remained significantly low during the differentiation period compared with undifferentiated pre-adipocytes. Lentivirus-mediated over-expression of miR-34a successfully up-regulated miR-34a. Higher levels of miR-34a in turn mitigated adipogenesis as evidenced by blunted Oil Red O staining. This observation was found to be in good agreement with the qPCR analysis, which showed a down-regulation of several key adipogenic markers. Conclusion The down-regulation of miR-34a is required during pre-adipocyte differentiation for the efficient proceedings of the adipogenic programme. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the potential therapeutic implication of miR-34a-based treatment in managing obesity.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.subject.lcshFat cells-
dc.subject.lcshCell differentiation-
dc.subject.lcshSmall interfering RNA-
dc.titlemiR-34a : a key regulator of adipogenesis-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5319019-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Medical Sciences-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineMedicine-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5319019-

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