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Conference Paper: A good time to dance? Differential effects of dance movement therapy for breast cancer patients during and after radiotherapy

TitleA good time to dance? Differential effects of dance movement therapy for breast cancer patients during and after radiotherapy
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Oncology psychology medical sciences
Psychiatry and neurology
Issue Date2014
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
The 16th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy, Lisbon, Portugal, 20-24 October 2014. In Psycho-Oncology, 2014, v. 23 suppl. S3, p. 95-96, abstract H-0157 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: This study explored the beneficial elements of Dance-movement therapy (DMT) and how the intervention satisfied patient needs as they underwent radiotherapy. DMT was well-received by Chinese patients and this was among the first studies to explore how the intervention could be suitable for patients still under treatment. To better understand intervention or exercise preferences and needs unique to patients receiving radiotherapy, the study also drew comparisons with patients who received DMT after they completed radiotherapy. METHOD: 159 Chinese women with breast cancer were recruited from the radiotherapy department and patient service centers across Hong Kong. Participants undergoing radiotherapy were randomized into the Radiotherapy or Post-radiotherapy control groups. The treatment group received DMT (6 sessions across 3 weeks, 90 minutes each) as they were undergoing radiotherapy, while the control group was provided with the same DMT intervention 1–2 months after completing radiotherapy. All participants responded in writing whether or not they found DMT helpful and how. Codes were identified inductively from the responses and quantified. Proportions of responses were compared between the two groups with Chi-square. RESULTS: Five main categories of benefit were identified in both groups: (1) Coping with cancer, treatment and physical symptoms, (2) Mental well-being, Attention and appreciation for self and body, (3) Total functioning, (4) Bridging back to normal and better life (e.g., More exercise motivation, commitment to being happy, balancing life rhythm), and (5) Shared positive experiences. Two of the categories, namely (1) Coping with cancer, treatment and physical symptoms, and (2) Mental well-being, attention and appreciation for self and body, were more prominently reported by the Radiotherapy group compared with the Post-radiotherapy group (Coping: p = 0.0071, Mental: p = 0.034). There were no significant differences in the other categories. CONCLUSIONS: This exploratory study reinstated the benefits of DMT as they were felt and experienced by participants with breast cancer. Meanwhile, findings added a new perspective that the time when interventions are administered throughout cancer survivorship can bring about different or even additional benefits to patients. This rendered support to arguments that the timing of intervention delivery is important. Mental health improvements were by far the most mentioned by the Radiotherapy cohort, which corroborated with findings from an earlier study on the effectiveness of DMT on stress reduction. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: Findings replicated a study on the effectiveness of DMT for a mixed cancer type cohort. Themes were enriched in this study. Newer sub-themes associated with physical body and self-appreciation indicates the psychological insults that treatment had on patients. Another new sub-theme of integrating exercise to their lifestyles testified to the desire of patients near the completion of treatment to reconnect back to usual lifestyles. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The pleasurable experience of DMT, as well as the psychological and physical relief appeared to have helped patients significantly in coping with their daily radiation treatment. This may have great vastly applied in clinical settings. For both the Radiotherapy and Post-radiotherapy groups, better symptoms management and psychological wellbeing can help speed up recovery and support patients in resuming their normal lives after their treatments.
DescriptionConference Theme: Integrating Psycho-Oncology into Mainstream Cancer Care; From Research to Action
Oral abstracts - Session H: Oncological rehabilitation
This free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the IPOS 16th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy, 20 – 24 October 2014, Lisbon, Portugal
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206134
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTH-
dc.contributor.authorLo, PHY-
dc.contributor.authorWan, AHY-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-20T12:48:18Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-20T12:48:18Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationThe 16th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy, Lisbon, Portugal, 20-24 October 2014. In Psycho-Oncology, 2014, v. 23 suppl. S3, p. 95-96, abstract H-0157-
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/206134-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Integrating Psycho-Oncology into Mainstream Cancer Care; From Research to Action-
dc.descriptionOral abstracts - Session H: Oncological rehabilitation-
dc.descriptionThis free journal suppl. entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the IPOS 16th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology and Psychosocial Academy, 20 – 24 October 2014, Lisbon, Portugal-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: This study explored the beneficial elements of Dance-movement therapy (DMT) and how the intervention satisfied patient needs as they underwent radiotherapy. DMT was well-received by Chinese patients and this was among the first studies to explore how the intervention could be suitable for patients still under treatment. To better understand intervention or exercise preferences and needs unique to patients receiving radiotherapy, the study also drew comparisons with patients who received DMT after they completed radiotherapy. METHOD: 159 Chinese women with breast cancer were recruited from the radiotherapy department and patient service centers across Hong Kong. Participants undergoing radiotherapy were randomized into the Radiotherapy or Post-radiotherapy control groups. The treatment group received DMT (6 sessions across 3 weeks, 90 minutes each) as they were undergoing radiotherapy, while the control group was provided with the same DMT intervention 1–2 months after completing radiotherapy. All participants responded in writing whether or not they found DMT helpful and how. Codes were identified inductively from the responses and quantified. Proportions of responses were compared between the two groups with Chi-square. RESULTS: Five main categories of benefit were identified in both groups: (1) Coping with cancer, treatment and physical symptoms, (2) Mental well-being, Attention and appreciation for self and body, (3) Total functioning, (4) Bridging back to normal and better life (e.g., More exercise motivation, commitment to being happy, balancing life rhythm), and (5) Shared positive experiences. Two of the categories, namely (1) Coping with cancer, treatment and physical symptoms, and (2) Mental well-being, attention and appreciation for self and body, were more prominently reported by the Radiotherapy group compared with the Post-radiotherapy group (Coping: p = 0.0071, Mental: p = 0.034). There were no significant differences in the other categories. CONCLUSIONS: This exploratory study reinstated the benefits of DMT as they were felt and experienced by participants with breast cancer. Meanwhile, findings added a new perspective that the time when interventions are administered throughout cancer survivorship can bring about different or even additional benefits to patients. This rendered support to arguments that the timing of intervention delivery is important. Mental health improvements were by far the most mentioned by the Radiotherapy cohort, which corroborated with findings from an earlier study on the effectiveness of DMT on stress reduction. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: Findings replicated a study on the effectiveness of DMT for a mixed cancer type cohort. Themes were enriched in this study. Newer sub-themes associated with physical body and self-appreciation indicates the psychological insults that treatment had on patients. Another new sub-theme of integrating exercise to their lifestyles testified to the desire of patients near the completion of treatment to reconnect back to usual lifestyles. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: The pleasurable experience of DMT, as well as the psychological and physical relief appeared to have helped patients significantly in coping with their daily radiation treatment. This may have great vastly applied in clinical settings. For both the Radiotherapy and Post-radiotherapy groups, better symptoms management and psychological wellbeing can help speed up recovery and support patients in resuming their normal lives after their treatments.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807-
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncology-
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectOncology psychology medical sciences-
dc.subjectPsychiatry and neurology-
dc.titleA good time to dance? Differential effects of dance movement therapy for breast cancer patients during and after radiotherapy-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLo, PHY: h0205829@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWan, AHY: awan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1099-1611.2014.3694-
dc.identifier.hkuros240777-
dc.identifier.hkuros253696-
dc.identifier.hkuros253763-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. S3-
dc.identifier.spage95, abstract H-0157-
dc.identifier.epage96-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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